vernacular

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Related to Vernacular language: Vernacular architecture, Standard language

vernacular

1. a local style of architecture, in which ordinary houses are built
2. designating or relating to the common name of an animal or plant
3. built in the local style of ordinary houses, rather than a grand architectural style

Vernacular

In architecture, vernacular buildings reflect the traditional architecture of the region originally developed in response to the climate, land conditions, social and cultural preferences, scenery, and locally available resources and materials. The forms are native or peculiar to a particular country or locality. It represents a form of building that is based on regional forms and materials, primarily concerned with ordinary domestic and functional buildings, rather than commercial structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the next few centuries, Scots was gradually ousted as the common language of Scottish government and public life by the southern English standard, though it has retained its vitality as the vernacular language of the Scottish working class.
It was not until the late 1980s that most East Asian libraries in North America could process their Chinese, Japanese, and Korean (CJK) materials in vernacular languages and scripts in library computers in the same way as Western-language materials.
If you look at the fifty years before the independence of India, you find the greatest writers in the subcontinent working in the sixteen vernacular languages of India.
Just as Pleiade poetics argued for a classically nuanced vernacular language, here Bruegel has drawn on the lessons gained from Italian art to reframe a vernacular genre painting.
The others tend to include their vernacular languages and some of them even have interpreters for English.
A close reading of such books in a vernacular language may reveal a lot about the concerns of the common believers in their particular context.
An example of adaptation would be our translating the Bible and liturgy into a vernacular language.
In his scathing analyses of current Argentine culture, Blaisten deftly wields current vernacular language, psychology, and irony to create marvelous satire in the philosophical sense, not directed at anyone in particular but pointing to the follies and illusions of his generation.
He says, 'The inapplicability of pedagogical concepts to the learning of vernacular language can be extended to other areas of learning'.
Alem Jamir is a writer working against all odds to provide a platform that will help preserve Nagaland's vernacular language and literature.
The document says, "The translation of the liturgical texts of the Roman liturgy is not so much a work of creative innovation as it is a rendering the original texts faithfully and accurately into the vernacular language.
Is writing in a vernacular language, given the ready availability of a "global" language such as English, in and of itself symptomatic of an intellectual parochiality that significantly reduces the possibility that a work written in that lang uage might attain some degree of quality?