molecular vibration

(redirected from Vibrational spectroscopy)

molecular vibration

[mə′lek·yə·lər vī′brā·shən]
(physical chemistry)
The theory that all atoms within a molecule are in continuous motion, vibrating at definite frequencies specific to the molecular structure as a whole as well as to groups of atoms within the molecule; the basis of spectroscopic analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: I propose to investigate the nanometer scale organization of delicate 2-dimensional molecular materials using nanoscale vibrational spectroscopy.
As the first and only handheld LIBS device geared toward the pharmaceutical market, the NanoLIBS offers pharmaceutical users a complementary solution to vibrational spectroscopy in conducting quick identification of raw materials.
Their topics include a statistical mechanical equation of state for predicting critical properties of confined fluid, preparing water-soluble formulations of hydrophobic active compounds by emulsion template processes, polymer processing using supercritical fluid-based technologies for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications, an integrated supercritical extraction and impregnation process for producing antibacterial scaffolds, and the interaction of supercritical carbon dioxide with polymers studied by vibrational spectroscopy.
Complex AC impedance, transference number and vibrational spectroscopy studies of proton conducting PVAc-NH4SCN polymer electrolytes.
Identification of medically relevant microorganisms by vibrational spectroscopy.
Vibrational spectroscopy at electrified interfaces.
By utilizing vibrational spectroscopy, users are able to compare the material's 'fingerprint,' obtained from a sample, with an authentic reference contained within the instrument.
Chemical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy has become operational only during the past decade, and is used more in academic than commercial contexts and more for exploration than routine analysis.
Because NIR is less selective than other forms of vibrational spectroscopy, it is susceptible to environmental factors like temperature and humidity in the field, which can lead to false positives with authentic products.
As previously reported, PHB due to its exceptional purity and chemical regularity, it is a model material for all kinds of fundamental studies of polymer crystallization and nucleation (12), specially using vibrational spectroscopy because in vibrational spectroscopy assignment of models in heavily dependent on the purity of samples.
Also, the Society for Applied Spectroscopy is celebrating their 50th anniversary by hosting two special symposia; one focuses on atomic spectroscopy and the other on vibrational spectroscopy.

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