Vilayet

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Vilayet

 

(Turkish vilâyet), an administrative-territorial unit in Turkey. The division into vilayets was introduced in 1866 in accordance with an 1864 law. The vali is the head of the vilayet (also called il).

References in periodicals archive ?
16; cipher from the Directorate of Security to the Vilayet of Van, 14 Cemaziy-ul Evvel 1332 [10 April 1914], BOA Dahiliye Nezareti Sifre Kalemi (DH SFR) [Interior Ministry Cipher Section] D.
Confessional Distribution in Ottoman Vilayets of Ioanina, Kosovo, Scutari, and Bitola, 1877-1908 (in percentage): Orthodox 27.
From the sixteenth century to 1918, Iraq was a part of the Turkish Ottoman Empire, divided into three vilayets (provinces): Mosul in the north, Baghdad in the center, and Basra in the south.
In 1900, the Land was divided among the vilayets (provinces) of Beirut and Damascus, and the mutesarriflik of Jerusalem.
Wallach does not cite specific incidents supporting her claim that Bell was busily working at the drawing-board, mapping out three vilayets of Kurdish Mosul in the north, Shia Basra in the south and Sunni Baghdad in the centre that were so dear to Bell's vision of Iraq.
Meanwhile the League assigned to Britain the Turkish vilayets of Mosul, Baghdad, and Basra as the Mesopotamia Mandate, and the vilayet of Palestine, or southern Syria, as the Palestine Mandate.
Neo-Ottoman" assertiveness of Ankara as a regional power likely will not signal the rebirth of the empire: Regional powers are unlikely to be subjugated as vilayets or vassal states in any meaningful way.
The flag hoisted by the FSA and SNC is the green, white and black tricolor with three five-pointed stars symbolizing the three vilayets (administrative regions) of D amascus, Aleppo, and Deir-ez-Zor dating back to the French Mandate period.
The British then took the three vilayets of Mosul, Baghdad and Basra to form what is today Iraq.
Iraq, after all, is an artificial state cobbled together by the British after World War I from the three former Ottoman vilayets of Mosul, Baghdad and Basra.
Under the Ottomans, there had been for centuries three vilayets, or regions, in what was then called Mesopotamia.