vines

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vines

(networking, product)
A family of local area networking products from Banyan.

VINES

(VIrtual NEtworking System) An earlier Unix System V-based network operating system from Banyan Systems that ran on DOS and OS/2-based servers. It provided internetworking of PCs, minis, mainframes and other computer resources providing information sharing across organizations of unlimited size. Incorporating mainframe-like security with a global network directory service called Streettalk, VINES allowed access to all network users and resources. Options included printer sharing, e-mail, remote PC dial-in, bridges and gateways. See ePresence. See also Vine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Retro shapes remain the foundation of the brand, from the round eye and aviator to the timeless panto, which is both Mr Viner and Eric Clapton's preferred shape.
Mr Viner said: "Earlier this year we planted 250 extra trees.
We're the only lab in Canada still offering Cibachrome, and we're only one of five labs worldwide to offer archival fiber-based printing on Ilford digital fiber paper," says Viner.
Hot summer temperatures, coupled with air pollution and the tendency for extreme storms, will make Birmingham an unpleasant place to live," said Dr Viner.
Viner, a staff psychiatrist at Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services in Reno.
Rebecca, 18, tried to defend her mother but was stabbed in the hand by window cleaner Viner at the family home in Tylorstown, Rhondda.
Pontypool: Tries - J Viner, N Lewis; Cons - J Williams (2); Pens - Williams (5).
Dr David Viner, a researcher at the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia said: 'It might appear that there is a debate in the scientific community about climate change and global warning.
Jacob Viner, a distinguished professor of economics first at Chicago and then at Princeton, believed that New England held the record for anti-climaxes, with two winners: the New York/New Haven/Hartford railroad and for God, for Country, and for Yale.
A computer-art pioneer, Viner has focused (since 1990) on the production of kinetic installations, whose quasi-minimalist forms are typically infused with an anarchic, often subtly perverse, sensibility.
In his celebrated article, Viner (1931) argued that, in the short run, firm costs were U-shaped (average) or upward sloping (marginal).