Virgilia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Virgilia

meek, gentle wife of Coriolanus. [Br. Lit.: Coriolanus]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Virgilia too is a reduced caricature of her Xenophonie counterpart (Ischomachus's wife is her husband's active partner, tasked with leadership of their servants), she, like Coriolanus, is an unusually rigid embodiment of conduct literature's dichotomies concerning occupation and gender.
Even under this condemnation for failure, pronounced by his goddess in disguise, there is room for the dissimulation of illusion and satire; Virgilia relates news of the outside world with a certain wicked humor and salty tongue in which Bras shares the satanic pleasure of living, as if he were not on his deathbed.
If Virgilia appears to Bras in both erotic-religious and pagan-destructive avatars, in A Reliquia a similar paradigm is embodied by Dona Patrocinio das Neves, whose religious fervor veils an intensely repressed sensuality (cf.
Though Coriolanus calls Virgilia "my gracious silence"
Coriolanus's expressions of love, Virgilia, like her epic forbear,
NAME CITY AMOUNT Mary Houston Los Angeles $ 100,000 Michael Cunningham San Diego $ 75,000 Virgilia Cave San Francisco $ 65,000 Elida Luevanos Fowler $ 30,000 Other California Gold Contestants $ 22,500 TOTAL $ 292,500
Entering and exiting become the subject of discussion a scant two scenes later, when Virgilia insists, "I'll not over the threshold till my lord return from the wars" (1.
Robert Ventresca and Franca Iacovetta provide a brief biography of Virgilia D'Andrea, an anarchist exile moving through Europe and North America in the early years of the 20th century, living in expatriate communities of political radicals, writing and organizing along the way when health permitted.
Mr Holden seems to think that Valeria is the mother of Coriolanus's son: he has confused her with Virgilia.
Yet, we know almost nothing about the women who inhabited and contributed to these communities, or those who, like Virgilia D'Andrea, belonged to a network of Italian militants who criss-crossed the globe, forging alliances with comrades in Europe, the Americas, and elsewhere.