virus hoaxes

(redirected from Virus hoax)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

virus hoaxes

Phony virus warnings delivered via email just to upset as many people as possible. Considering the speed with which messages can be copied and sent electronically, once a virus hoax gets started, it can traverse the world in minutes. Hoaxes such as the Good Times virus tell people that if they open their email, their hard drives will be erased or some such catastrophe will occur.

Just Go Ahead and Delete a File
Another popular hoax is to send an email message to Windows users telling them that a particular file has been downloaded into their computers along with instructions for deleting it. However, the files are actually valid Windows components, such as SULFNBK.EXE and JDBGMGR.EXE, which may be required and have to be re-installed.

Is it a Hoax or Not?
Antivirus vendors such as McAfee, Symantec and Trend Micro maintain lists of virus hoaxes as do some websites such as Snopes.com. The Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC) within the U.S. Department of Energy maintained a list of virus hoaxes for 13 years before discontinuing it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The truth is that viral marketing campaigns like this generate work for IT departments and anti-virus support desks as we have to reassure users that it is not a genuine infection, say Sophos This is not the first time a virus hoax has been started to promote a product.
The following virus hoax re-surfaced last week and did little to improve my hopes for the future of humanity.
asp to check the authenticity of that story on McAfee's Virus Hoax list.
A virus hoax is a message that isalmost always sent by e-mail that appears as a chain letter.
In 1994, the "Good Times" warning introduced the information age to the virus hoax.
Or that one about the virus, then the one about the virus hoax.
He recalls one man who erased his hard disk and lost everything (with no backups) because he believed a virus hoax.
Like a nagging cold that won't go away, the "Good Times" computer virus hoax has flared up again.
The JDBGMGR virus hoax - an email duping users into deleting a legitimate file from their PCs - was first spotted in April 2002 and has topped Sophos's hoax chart every month since May.
exe virus hoax, where users were falsely warned to delete a non-threatening Windows file; well-meaning users forwarded the message to friends, and so on, thus perpetuating the hoax.
Indeed, I would have to agree with those like virus hoax information site Vmyths who argue that it is very often the hysteria whipped up by the media that results in hundreds of 'warning e-mails' that has more chance of slowing down the Internet.