Vision for Space Exploration


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Vision for Space Exploration

NASA's main plan for its future and the future of US space exploration in the early 21st century. It emerged in a speech made by President George W. Bush on Jan. 14 2004, in which he ‘set a new course for America's space program.’ The Vision program outlined a ‘building-block’ strategy of human and robotic missions, commencing with the return of the space shuttle to regular service following the loss of Columbia in Feb. 2003 and the completion of the International Space Station. The program calls for the return of humans to the Moon by 2020 and seeks to pave the way for human missions to explore Mars and beyond.
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The 2008 authorization act authorizes appropriations for NASA only through FY2009 and still reflects congressional endorsement of an unmodified Vision for Space Exploration.
We are extremely excited by this innovative payload, and we are confident it will fulfill our expectations and support the Vision for Space Exploration," Steidle added.
Congressional and public reaction to the president's vision for space exploration has been tepid.
From now on, per Glenn Mahone, when we talk about or write about the new space exploration vision that President Bush put out in January, please refer to it as: The Vision for Space Exploration
Organisers have said that Aldrin will touch on his vision for space exploration, mission to mars legacy and his views on the latest developments in aerospace technology.
According to a report in New Scientist, the draft paper, posted to the National Space Society blog, outlines a plan to replace George W Bush's 2004 Vision for Space Exploration, which called for returning astronauts to the Moon by 2020.
25) This policy incorporated key elements of the Vision for Space Exploration ("Vision"), often referred to as the Moon/Mars program.
Observers anticipate that the next administration will have a vision for space exploration different from that of the Bush administration, and they also note that it will address the drain of science resources in the U.
Our entire team is fully committed to supporting NASA as we join together to help make the vision for space exploration a reality.
Papers from a February 2006 forum present the latest work in thermophysics applications in microgravity, space nuclear power and propulsion, space colonization, human/robotic technology, and the national vision for space exploration.
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) plans to spend over $100 billion on capabilities and technologies to achieve the initial goals of the President's 2004 Vision for Space Exploration.
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