visual field

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visual field

The angular extent of space which can be perceived when the head and eyes are kept fixed.
References in periodicals archive ?
director of the Visual Field Reading Center at the University of Iowa.
An 83-year-old white woman presented to the neuro-ophthalmology clinic after an outside ophthalmologist noted binasal visual field deficits on confrontation testing.
Relevant characteristics of the participants, such as age and the diameter of their visual field (Goldman III4e target), were extracted from the patients' files.
These results suggest that while the limited attentional resources of the left hemisphere are biased toward the right half of the visual field, the absence of contralateral attentional demands allows these resources to be allocated to the left visual field.
Visual field assessment is an important clinical tool in optometric practice; however, in individuals with macular disease who may have unstable or extrafoveal fixation, it can be difficult to obtain reliable visual field results using conventional perimetry.
After the analysis, team found that the scalloped hammerheads had the largest monocular visual field, at an amazing 182 deg.
BOSTON, May 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Innovative prism glasses can significantly improve the vision and the daily lives of patients with hemianopia, a condition that blinds half the visual field in both eyes.
Those less common tests include measurements of an eye's ability to see darkness and lightness in objects, which is contrast sensitivity, visual fields, and sensitivity to glare.
A disturbance of brain processes that then direct conscious visual inspection causes her to pay attention to only one of two items positioned in separate visual fields, Mattingley's group contends in the Jan.
Because ability to drive was not accurately predicted by diagnosis, pathology, loss of brain mass, or by neuropsychological tests alone, they developed and investigated the CBDI, which consists of (a) a battery of computerized and paper-and-pencil neuropsychological tests (many related to visual processing); (b) visual screening using the Keystone Driver Vision Telebinocular, which is the machine used in many state drivers' licensing offices; (c) a reaction time test focused on braking ability; and (d) an examination of visual fields.
This stability was irrespective of whether patients previously conducted VRT for six or 12 months suggesting that restored sectors of the visual fields are maintained and used in every day vision.