Vogt-Russell theorem

Vogt–Russell theorem

(fohkt russ -ĕl) A theorem proposed independently by H.N. Russell and H. Vogt in 1926 stating that, if the age, mass, and chemical composition of a star are specified, then its temperature and luminosity are (in almost all cases) uniquely determined. Hence for a star whose age, mass, and chemical composition are known, the equations of stellar structure will have only one solution.

Vogt-Russell theorem

[′fȯkt ′rəs·əl ‚thir·əm]
(astrophysics)
A theorem that states that if the pressure, opacity, and rate of energy generation in a star depend only on the local values of temperature, density, and chemical composition, then the star's structure is uniquely determined by its mass and chemical composition. Also known as Russell-Vogt theorem.
Mentioned in ?