volatile

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Related to Volatile fatty acids: butanoic acid

volatile

1. (of a substance) capable of readily changing from a solid or liquid form to a vapour; having a high vapour pressure and a low boiling point
2. Computing (of a memory) not retaining stored information when the power supply is cut off
3. a volatile substance

volatile

[′väl·əd·əl]
(chemistry)
Readily passing off by evaporation.

volatile

Descriptive of a substance which passes off easily as a gas or vapor, evaporating quickly.

volatile

(programming)

volatile

(storage)

volatile

With regard to computer memory, it means "temporary" and not "highly changeable," which is the usual meaning of the word. See volatile memory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Energy metabolism of volatile fatty acids from the gastrointestinal tract in various species.
Gas profiles assay and volatile fatty acid (VFA): The headspace gas in the serum bottle was collected for analyzing methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen by gas chromatography (GC-2010, Shimadzu, Kyoto, Japan) equipped with column (Shincarbon ST.
The volatile fatty acids catch a ride in the bloodstream to the liver.
Thereafter, the fermentation fluid was centrifuged (3,000 rpm, 15 min), and samples of the supernatant stored at -20[degrees]C for volatile fatty acid (VFA) and ammonia-N analyses.
Table 4 shows the effects of enzyme supplementation on cecal and colonic volatile fatty acid concentrations.
The rumen fluid samples were analyzed for ammonia N (Conway, 1957) and total volatile fatty acid (Barnett and Reid, 1957).
Lactic acid and volatile fatty acid in both rumen fluid and extract from Napier grass silages were determined by means of HPLC (Aminex[R] HPX-87H, 300 mm x 7.
05) the concentrations of propionic acid, n-pentanoic acid and total volatile fatty acids in the colon as well as total tract iso-valeric acid.
The concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA), including acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate, valerate and iso-valerate, were measured using a gas chromatograph as described by Yue et al.
The frozen rumen fluid samples were thawed at room temperature, after then, centrifuged for 10 minutes at 3,000 rpm (1,465xg), and the supernatant used for ammonia N and volatile fatty acids (VFA) analyses.
To determinate volatile fatty acids (VFA) and ammonia-N, 1 ml rumen fluid was treated with 0.