volatilization

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volatilization

[‚väl·əd·əl·ə′zā·shən]
(thermodynamics)
The conversion of a chemical substance from a liquid or solid state to a gaseous or vapor state by the application of heat, by reducing pressure, or by a combination of these processes. Also known as vaporization.
References in periodicals archive ?
2002) developed a model to estimate ammonia volatilisation by using factors for fertiliser type and placement, soil properties (pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC)), farming practice, and climate (temperate, tropical).
Vaio PN, Cabrera ML, Kissel DE, Rema JA, Newsome JF, Calvert VH (2008) Ammonia volatilisation from urea-based fertilisers applied to tall fescue pastures in Georgia, USA.
3] volatilisation, especially if subsequent nitrification reactions were inhibited by dry soil or high N[O.
Selvarajah N (1991) Field studies of ammonia volatilisation potentials of unsaturated soils fertilised with granular urea.
In addition, excessive inhibition of the nitrification process may cause substantial ammonia volatilisation (see Table 6).
Table 10 shows that the measured turf uptake of N in the treatment plots was slightly lower than the mineral N supply measured in the field incubation study, and this more than likely reflects losses of mineral N through volatilisation, denitrification, and leaching, which would not have been helped by the winter dormancy of the couch turf crop further limiting its N uptake.
A custom-built module was added to the standard release to describe the volatilisation of ammonia (Vogeler et al.
As pointed out above gaseous emissions of nitrogen via ammonia volatilisation, nitrification, and denitrification are the dominant mechanisms for the loss of fertiliser nitrogen from Australian agroecosystems.
The fate of this N was not determined in this study, but it was assumed to have moved off-site due to a combination of gaseous N loss pathways (ammonia volatilisation and/or denitrification) and leaching losses, with the latter evidenced by enriched N[O.
Ammonia volatilisation was rapid with maximum values of N[H.
3] volatilisation and to determine the importance of the different loss processes in that environment.
Diazinon and atrazine dissipated rapidly at both sites, while the trifluralin and, to a lesser extent, terbuthylazine and bromacil data indicated some volatilisation losses.