volatility

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volatility

[‚väl·ə′til·əd·ē]
(thermodynamics)
The quality of having a low boiling point or subliming temperature at ordinary pressure or, equivalently, of having a high vapor pressure at ordinary temperatures.

Volatility

 

the property of liquid and solid substances of passing into the gaseous state. Volatility is measured by the concentration of saturated vapor for a substance at a particular temperature; it is expressed in milligrams per cu m or milligrams per liter and is calculated using the equation of state for ideal gases. The volatility of a substance increases with increasing temperature because of an increase in its saturated vapor pressure. In thermodynamics, “volatility” is also used in place of “fugacity.”

volatility

Volatility generally refers to a situation that is constantly changing, such as startups, mergers, acquisitions and failures in the tech world. Stock market volatility refers to the index constantly rising and falling. In all cases, the rate of volatility or the change in volatility are of concern to interested parties. See volatile.