Volhynia


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Volhynia

(vŏlĭ`nyə), Ukr. and Rus. Volyn, Pol. Wołyń, historic region, W Ukraine, around the headstreams of the Pripyat and Western Bug rivers in an area of forests, lakes, and marshlands. One of the oldest Slavic settlements in Europe, it derived its name from the extinct city of Volyn or Velyn, said to have stood on the Western Bug. Volhynia's early history from c.981 coincides with that of the duchies of Volodymyr (see Volodymyr-VolynskyyVolodymyr-Volynskyy
, Pol. Włodzimierz, Rus. Vladimir-Volynski, city (1989 pop. 38,000), NW Ukraine. It was founded in the 9th cent. and supposedly refounded in 988 by the Grand Duke Vladimir I (Volodymyr I) of Kievan Rus.
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) and Halych. After the disintegration (c.1340) of the grand duchy of Halych-Volodymyr, Volhynia was divided (c.1388) between Poland (western part) and Lithuania (eastern part). With the Polish-Lithuanian union of 1569, Volhynia became a quasi-autonomous province of Poland. During the second and third partitions of Poland (1793, 1795), Volhynia passed to Russia and was made (1797) a province. In 1921 the Treaty of Riga returned W Volhynia to Poland, but the rest passed to Ukraine. Poland ceded its section of Volhynia to the USSR in 1939, and the Soviet-Polish border agreement of 1945 confirmed it as a Soviet possession. In 1943–44 the region was the scene of ethnic massacres in which some 100,000 Poles died and some 20,000 Ukrainians were killed in revenge. This section constitutes the Volyn region, a rich agricultural lowland and coal-mining area.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, when the expert Jew German Barats traveled to the southwestern region of Russia (Kiev, Podolia, and Volhynia provinces) to popularize "the enrollment of Jewish children into government-sponsored Jewish schools" the Hasidic Jews of Kamenets-Podol'sk threw stones at him.
His birthplace was Lutsk in Volhynia, then a city in Poland and now in northwest Ukraine with a population of over 200,000.
In the Volhynian massacre, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA), the military wing of Stepan Bandera's Organisation of Ukrainian Nationalists, killed up to 100,000 Poles mainly in the Volhynia, or Volyn region that is part of today's western Ukraine but was part of Poland before World War II.
9) On the OUN-B's participation in the Holocaust, see also Ivan Katchanovski, "The OUN, the UPA, and the Nazi-Led Genocide in Ukraine," paper presented at the Association for the Study of Nationalities Conference, Columbia University, 15-17 April 2010; and Jared McBride, " A Sea of Blood and Tears': Ethnic Diversity and Mass Violence in Nazi-Occupied Volhynia, Ukraine 1941-1944" (PhD diss.
If the Ukrainians are to be allowed to sing such political songs as 1944, perhaps they could sing of Volhynia, in 1943, where Stepan Bandera - a man whose T-shirt many in the Kiev junta wear and revere - murdered 100,000 Polish and Jewish people on behalf of Nazi Germany.
Furthermore, it is crucial to mention that this poem is also a version of one written by the inspiration for Zoli's character, Papusza: "Bloody Tears: What We Went Through Under the Germans in Volhynia in the Years '43 and '44.
Many of them have roots in present-day Ukraine, in Podolia and Volhynia, the territories from which their ancestors were expelled by the decision of the Great Powers after the Second World War.
At the same time, Buczkowski perceives the tragedy of Jews in the broader context --the tragedy of all other nationalities inhabiting the areas of Volhynia and Podolia.
He had lived in Volhynia in western Ukraine briefly where he taught at the lyceum in Kremenets, but was less interested in Left Bank Ukraine and its Hetmanate, which had been outside the Polish orbit since 1648.
Meanwhile the Czech government said it was ready, if needed, to help the 20,000 ethnic Czechs living in Ukraine's northwest Volhynia region.
Rudolf Poch's wife (and doctoral student), Hella, born Schurer, 'supplemented' the data collected at prisoner-of-war camps with analyses of refugees from Volhynia, mainly women and children, interned at camp Niederalm near Salzburg.