Volsunga Saga

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Volsunga Saga

cycle of Scandinavian legends, major source of Niebelungenlied. [Scand. Lit.: Benét, 1064]
See: Epic
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Likewise, her analysis of the character of Sigurd in the Icelandic Volsunga Saga is frustrating, with both excellent points and needless repetition.
Variations on Volsunga Saga" ("Tilbrygoi vio Volsungasogu") is a diary entry Johannessen wrote after hearing the news of Borges's death.
The Role of Women in Anglo-Saxon Culture: Hildeburh in Beowulf and a Curious Counterpart in the Volsunga Saga.
Brunhild or Brunhild or Brynhild also called Brunhilda or BrunhildeA beautiful Amazonlike princess in ancient Germanic heroic literature, known from Old Norse sources (the Eddic poems and the Volsunga saga) and from the Nibelungenlied in German.
In Volsunga saga, when he hears of the approach of an enemy army under Alf, Sigmundr konungr .
It plays with ideas and attitudes we can see in Gilgamesh, but also in other orally-based epics: Homer's Iliad, the Icelandic Volsunga Saga, the German Niebelungenlied, the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf, the French Chanson de Roland, and the Spanish El Cid.
Although based on Scandinavian legends as told in the poetic Edda and the Volsunga Saga, it draws further on German legend and omits much of the supernatural material; Siegfried, for instance, is no longer a descendant of the Scandinavian god Odin but rather the son of the king of the Netherlands and a typical hero of medieval romance.
I will also be looking at medieval and renaissance parallels in Beowulf and the Volsunga Saga and Book I of Spenser's Fairie Queene, as possible sources for the largely comic treatment of dragons in the works I am considering.
69) before he succumbed to a lust for gold and power--greater significance than Regin had in his Urtext, the Volsunga Saga.
This is a grim and brutal British fantasy, based on the first part of the Icelandic Volsunga Saga.
Although the codex is missing several pages, some of the lost poems were preserved in prose form in the Volsunga saga.
Saxo's Gesta Danorum, Sir Tristrem, Lagamon's Brut, Floamanna saga, the Annals of Ulster, Volsunga saga, Hrolfs saga kraka, Gongu-Hrolfs saga, Landnamabok, Gwenlendinga pattr, and Reykdoela saga cannot fill in the narrative gaps which lend the Wife's Lament its enigmatic aspect.