Volsunga Saga

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Volsunga Saga

cycle of Scandinavian legends, major source of Niebelungenlied. [Scand. Lit.: Benét, 1064]
See: Epic
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In his "Lecture on Dragons," presented to an audience of children at the University Museum in Oxford, on 1 January 1938, (shortly after the publication of The Hobbit) besides discussing the dragon fight in Beowulf and the fight between Sigurd and Fafnir in the Volsunga Saga, Tolkien also related the legend of Thor and the Midgard Serpent, and briefly referred "to Chinese dragons, to Merlin and the red and white dragons in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain, and to St.
Similarly, in the Saga of Ragnar Lodbrokk ('Shaggy-Breeks'), which follows the Volsunga Saga in the unique surviving manuscript containing both, the hero boiled his clothes in pitch and rolled in sand before doing battle with the dragon.
Anderson's pair of anthologies, Tales Before Tolkien and Tales Before Narnia; he included one story that is a direct re-telling of folk material in Tales Before Tolkien, "The Story of Sigurd" (Lang's abridgement for The Red Fairy Book of William Morris's translation of The Volsunga Saga), but none in Tales Before Narnia.
Shippey considers not just Tolkien's retellings of Volsunga Saga and the Nibelungeleid and related materials--his techniques, his aims in retelling these stories, and the success of his version in capturing the "daimonic force" (293) of the originals--but also the textual history of Tolkien's source material and the various influences working with these texts may have had on Tolkien's legendarium.
Since we have long understood Tolkien's debt to medieval literature such as the Poetic Edda, The Volsunga Saga, and Gawain, it is somewhat bewildering that the likelihood of a much more extensive relationship between Pearl and the Legendarium has not been more thoroughly weighed than these tentative and passing critical comments.
Edda; Volsunga Saga are the sources throughout this section.
The distinction Tolkien draws between Aragorn's role as king and warrior is best examined through a comparison with a source text Tolkien was familiar with: The Volsunga Saga.
At this point, a brief comparison of the Volsunga Saga and the Nibelungenlied is warranted, as it contains the seeds of the historical development that Tolkien's narrative represents.
Following the text notes, in his short essay on ravens, Rateliff does mention Odin's ravens, Hugin and Munin, as well as the traditions of the Volsunga Saga and the Fafnismal, but he might also have mentioned the Krakumal ("The Lay of the Raven"), contained in the same codex as the Volsunga Saga.
And there was one major dragon, from another non-French source, setting Tolkien's notion of what a dragon ought to be for good and all, in "The Story of Sigurd," Lang's own abridgement of William Morris's translation of The Volsunga Saga.
In his third year at Oxford Tolkien was awarded the Skeat Prize for English, and spent his five pounds prize money on three of Morris's works: The Life and Death of Jason, Morris's translation of The Volsunga Saga, and The House of the Wolfings (Carpenter 69).
Morris's translation of The Volsunga Saga led Tolkien into the world where he was to spend most of his academic life: he was to specialize, as undergraduate and later as professor, in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English and he had a passion for the Icelandic sagas.