Volsunga Saga


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Volsunga Saga

cycle of Scandinavian legends, major source of Niebelungenlied. [Scand. Lit.: Benét, 1064]
See: Epic
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Likewise, her analysis of the character of Sigurd in the Icelandic Volsunga Saga is frustrating, with both excellent points and needless repetition.
Here again, Icelandic sagas offer illuminating parallels; in Volsunga saga, Sigmund is hiding from King Siggeir, and meets Signy:
At this point, Brunhild's role, so important in the Volsunga Saga, becomes vague, and that of the retainer Hagen becomes dominant.
In his "Lecture on Dragons," presented to an audience of children at the University Museum in Oxford, on 1 January 1938, (shortly after the publication of The Hobbit) besides discussing the dragon fight in Beowulf and the fight between Sigurd and Fafnir in the Volsunga Saga, Tolkien also related the legend of Thor and the Midgard Serpent, and briefly referred "to Chinese dragons, to Merlin and the red and white dragons in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain, and to St.
Volsunga saga, Fornaldar sogur Nordurlanda 1 (Reykjavik: Islendingasagnautgafan, 1981), p.
Edda; Volsunga Saga are the sources throughout this section.
The Volsunga Saga is the main source of Wagner's opera cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen, although names and plot details vary.
The distinction Tolkien draws between Aragorn's role as king and warrior is best examined through a comparison with a source text Tolkien was familiar with: The Volsunga Saga.
The most familiar image of the Valkyrie is the Brunhild of the Volsunga Saga and Wagner 's Ring des Nibelungen; they no longer are the bloodthirsty creatures of Old Norse legend but rather lusty Amazonian virgins reputed to be the wisest of women.
Following the text notes, in his short essay on ravens, Rateliff does mention Odin's ravens, Hugin and Munin, as well as the traditions of the Volsunga Saga and the Fafnismal, but he might also have mentioned the Krakumal ("The Lay of the Raven"), contained in the same codex as the Volsunga Saga.
The brief references to the heroic deeds of Siegfried allude to several ancient stories, many of which are preserved in the Scandinavian Poetic Edda, Volsunga saga, and Thithriks saga, in which Siegfried is called Sigurd.
In his third year at Oxford Tolkien was awarded the Skeat Prize for English, and spent his five pounds prize money on three of Morris's works: The Life and Death of Jason, Morris's translation of The Volsunga Saga, and The House of the Wolfings (Carpenter 69).