volt

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volt

[for Alessandro VoltaVolta, Alessandro, Conte
, 1745–1827, Italian physicist. He was professor of physics at the Univ. of Pavia from 1779 and became famous for his work in electricity. Napoleon I made him a count and a senator of the kingdom of Lombardy.
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], abbr. V, unit of electric potentialpotential, electric,
work per unit of electric charge expended in moving a charged body from a reference point to any given point in an electric field (see electrostatics).
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 and electromotive forceelectromotive force,
abbr. emf, difference in electric potential, or voltage, between the terminals of a source of electricity, e.g., a battery from which no current is being drawn. When current is drawn, the potential difference drops below the emf value.
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. It is defined as the difference of electric potential existing across the ends of a conductor carrying a constant current of 1 ampere when the power dissipated is 1 watt. The kilovolt (1,000 V), the millivolt (0.001 V), and the microvolt (0.000001 V) are units derived from the volt. See voltmetervoltmeter,
instrument used to measure differences of electric potential, commonly called voltage, in volts or units that are multiples or fractions of volts. A voltmeter is usually combined with an ammeter and an ohmmeter in a multipurpose instrument.
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.

Volt

 

a unit of electrical voltage, electrical potential difference, and electromotive force (emf), which is included in the International System of Units. It is named after the Italian scientist A. Volta and is designated by the letter V. It was adopted at the First International Congress of Electricians in 1881 as a practical unit of emf equal to 108 units in the cgs system of units. From 1893 to 1948 the international volt (Vint) was used. It was equal to the voltage or emf which in a conductor having a resistance of 1 Oint produced a current of 1 Aint. An accurate value was established for the international volt by a standard consisting of a group of normal Weston cells. With the change in 1948 to the system of absolute practical electrical units, the volt (Vabs) became a derived unit which is used in the International System of Units: 1 V is the electrical voltage that in an electrical circuit produces a direct current of 1 ampere when dissipating a power of 1 watt.

The unit for potential difference in the cgs electrostatic system and the cgs system is equal to 300 Vabs (more accurately 10-8·c V, where c is the numerical value of the velocity of light in a vacuum expressed in cm/sec). 1 Vint = 1.00035 Vabs.

volt

[vōlt]
(electricity)
The unit of potential difference or electromotive force in the meter-kilogram-second system, equal to the potential difference between two points for which 1 coulomb of electricity will do 1 joule of work in going from one point to the other. Symbolized V.

volt

In electric systems the unit of potential difference or electromotive force; when applied across a resistance of 1 ohm, will result in a current flow of 1 ampere.

volt

1
the derived SI unit of electric potential; the potential difference between two points on a conductor carrying a current of 1 ampere, when the power dissipated between these points is 1 watt.

volt

2, volte
1. a small circle of determined size executed in dressage
2. a leap made in fencing to avoid an opponent's thrust

volt

A unit of measurement of force, or pressure, in an electrical circuit. The common voltage of an AC power line is 120 volts of alternating current (alternating directions). Common voltages within a computer are from 3 to 12 volts of direct current (one direction only). See voltage and volt-amps.
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Reuters, a London-based news organization that is part of Thomson Reuters, made the assessment of losses on each Chevy Volt sold based on figures from automobile analysts who compared and contrasted the hybrid's selling price with what it costs to produce each Volt.
The loss of the neutral wire, for example, can lead the voltage to increase to the 160 to 200 volt range for an extended period of time.
The design of the instrument is such that no readjustment of its coils will be required when the impending changes in the ohm and the volt are accomplished.
We talk about putting the customer at the center of everything we do, and we ve literally done that with the 2016 Volt.
Volt owners who charge regularly typically drive more than 970 miles between fill-ups and visit the gas station less than once a month.
The chassis-mount design features a dual bobbin with a high 4,000 volts, primary to secondary isolation.
In the event of an AC power surge or lightning strike, each MBK-E and PRO-E unit will provide up to 500 Joules of surge protection (440 Joules on 230 volt PRO-E models).
8 Volt Intel StrataFlash(R) Wireless Memory, are designed to ease manufacturers' provision of such features as camera capabilities, games and email in relatively thin cell phones.
The first two transformers in the series are designed for a forward converter DC-to-DC topology operating from a wide-range telecom input voltage of 36 to 72 volts.
8 volt multi-level cell wireless flash memory chip based on .
While silicon Schottky diodes only reach blocking voltages of about 200 Volts and Gallium Arsenide diodes up to 250 Volts, silicon carbide diodes are capable of the range from 300 Volts to 3,500 Volts, offering new system options with higher voltages in switched mode power supplies and the increasingly growing market of Power Factor Correction (PFC) applications.