Votes


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Votes

 

a Baltic Finnic tribe that lived south of the Gulf of Finland in the territory of the Vodskaia Piatina, in the north-western part of Novgorod Land. Although the Votes are mentioned in 11th-century sources, scholars believe that the Votes began to merge with the Slavs as early as the ninth century. The Votian language is closely related to the north-eastern dialect of Estonian. The Votes had completed the process of Slavicization by the 19th century. Isolated settlements of Votes still exist along the southern coast of the Gulf of Finland.

REFERENCE

Sedov, V. V. “Etnicheskii sostav naseleniia severo-zapadnykh zemel’ Velikogo Novgoroda (IX-XIV vv.).” In the collection Sovetskaia arkheologiia, vol. 18. Moscow, 1953.
References in classic literature ?
Cast your whole vote, not a strip of paper merely, but your whole influence.
Now and again he would mutter, 'Ay, well, I'll be going to vote - little did I think the day would come,' and so on, but if he rose it was only to sit down again, and at last she crossed over to him and said softly, (no sarcasm in her voice now),
When the women get the ballot, they will vote for prohibition," I said.
And when they come to vote, they will vote for prohibition.
To vote Conservative was part of Matthew's religion.
the Los Angeles company that manages American Idol voting, told the magazine Broadcast and Cable that votes dialed at regular intervals indicate that the votes might have been machine-dialed.
More than half of the votes cast for the city elections in April were done through absentee voting, City Clerk Sharon Dawson said.
Unlike voting systems in use today, these schemes would give voters a way to check that their votes were recorded as marked.
Without an investigation we can only guess how many votes can be cast illegally, but the Washington Times reported on October 26, 2002 that Larry Gray, a former sanitation director for Helena, Arkansas, pleaded guilty when charged with submitting more than 25 absentee ballots.
The interests of management often conflict with our interests as shareowners, which is why we have proxy votes in the first place," Latham says.
Her infamous "butterfly ballot"--designed, Gumbel notes deliciously, ostensibly to help elderly, mostly Democratic voters by enlarging the type-size of candidate names--likely deprived Al Gore of more than 2,000 votes, and, hence, the presidency.
In Selma, white officials, including the sheriff, were preventing most of its black residents from registering to vote.