International Phonetic Alphabet

(redirected from Vowel space)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

International Phonetic Alphabet

[‚in·tər¦nah·ən·əl phə¦ned·ik ′al·fə‚bet]
(linguistics)
A phonetic transcription system the purpose of which is to represent with graphic symbols the distinctive sounds of human speech, regardless of language.

International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

The internationally agreed system of code words identifying an alphabet and numbers, so as to avoid ambiguity during reception. See phonetic alphabets.

International Phonetic Alphabet

(text, human language)
(IPA) A system of symbols for representing pronunciation. There is no commonly agreed way to represent IPA in ASCII characters though it can be represented in Unicode.

References in periodicals archive ?
4) Again, stressed vowels occupy extreme positions in the vowel space, while unstressed vowels show varying degrees of centralization.
0]), vowel formants frequencies, vowel spaces and durations, speaking rate, and loudness.
The best-known proponent of this type of peripheral/nonperipheral distinction is probably Labov, for whom "[b]oth front and back vowel spaces are divided into two regions of phonological space: a peripheral region, outside of the vowel space, and a nonperipheral one, closer to the center" (1994: 32).
Lindau's view, in turn, is that "[l]ong and tense vowels are more peripheral in the auditory/acoustic vowel space, while short and lax vowels are more central" (1978: 557), so that "[t]he difference between tense and lax vowels is best labeled by a feature Peripheral" (1978: 558) which is "best described with reference to the acoustic domain" (1978: 541), that is, as the "amount of centralization on [an] acoustic chart" (1978: 559).
But it matters greatly: if it was already a kind of I, and there were two high tense vowels (say, [i:] and [iy]) in that vowel space, then no chain shifting occurred of the type described by Labov, in which vowels maintain their distance and move like horses in tandem.
This appraisal will include descriptions of the location of SMM vowels in the vowel space along with an analysis of the degree to which they are reduced, and information regarding the extent to which the vowels may or may not be rounded.
The acoustic measurements of Estonian vowel formants in CV(V)CV context show that quality differences of the stressed vowels in Q1, Q2 and Q3 are small and do not exceed 1 Bark in F1-F2 vowel space (Eek, Meister 1998).