Vulgarisms


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Vulgarisms

 

crude words that are unacceptable in standard speech or expressions that are incorrect in form.

Vulgarisms are sometimes introduced into the speech of characters of the text of a literary work as an intentional stylistic element in order to convey a certain everyday coloration—for example, “Akh, vam ne khotitsia l’ pod ruchku proitit’sia?” “Moi milyi! Konechno! Khotitsia, khotitsia” (“Ya wanna go for a walk?” “Sure I wanna”; E. Bagritskii). In present-day stylistics the term “popular speech” is used more often than the term “vulgarisms.”

References in periodicals archive ?
The paper's top editors judged that in this situation, it was not enough to say merely that an obscenity or a vulgarism had been used.
I miss the Chicago show years when the Windy City wrapped the CES in urbanity and natural vitality rather than in vulgarisms and synthetic delight.
Most translations for church reading try to avoid such unintentional misunderstandings, associations, and vulgarisms.
Mr Thwaite was dismayed by its 'bad grammar, pretentious barbarisms and vulgarisms which sound like stuff produced by third-rate advertising copywriters'.
This term--and not the vulgarisms that Hollywood seeks to cram into every line of every screenplay--is, need one say, the really obscene four-letter word of modern American life.
On the lexical level, we can also point at vulgarisms, which are not often used in literature in this function--to present the unpresentable--but theoretically they can occur in regular language usage.
But what is most striking about the American personae assumed by the stilyagi was that these alternate personalities were built out of vulgarisms.
67) According to Stephens and Winkler 1995, 367, both texts contain 'a number of vulgarisms and uncorrected errors in both the prose and the verse sections of the text.