WIMP


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

WIMP

1. Computing windows, icons, menus (or mice), pointers: denoting a type of user-friendly screen display used on small computers
2. Physics weakly interacting massive particle

WIMP

Abbrev. for weakly interacting massive particle. A hypothetical elementary particle that is a candidate for dark matter. It is a stable neutral particle, somewhat heavier than the neutron, that interacts only weakly with ordinary matter. Theory indicates that sufficient WIMPS could have formed in the early Universe to account for the high proportion of dark matter.

WIMP

[wimp]

WIMP

(operating system)
Windows, Icons, Menus and Pointers (or maybe Windows, Icons, Mouse, Pull-down menus).

The style of graphical user interface invented at Xerox PARC, popularised by the Apple Macintosh and now available in other varieties such as the X Window System, OSF/Motif, NeWS, RISC OS and Microsoft Windows.

See menuitis, user-obsequious, window system.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the stakes so high, the WIMP pursuit has to continue.
And while the XENON100 experiment found no dark matter signal in 100 days of testing, the researchers' newly calculated upper limits on the mass of WIMPs and the probability of their interacting with other particles are the best in the world, said UCLA physics professor Katsushi Arisaka, a member of the international collaboration.
Third, WIMP GUIs, with their 2D widgets, were designed for and are well suited to 2D applications such as word processing, document layout, and spreadsheets.
WIMPs are thought to interact with normal matter only via the weak nuclear force and gravity.
Simply put: either WIMPs don't exist at all, or the WIMPs that do exist really, really don't like interacting with normal matter.
The leading theory says dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs (S&T: January 2013, page 26).
But the energy released by the potential WIMPs is at the very lower limit of the detectors' sensitivity, warns Richard Gaitskell, a physicist at Brown University, making erroneous detections more likely.
With the realization that WIMPs might have relatively low masses, it may be possible to reconcile the incompatibilities among current WIMP-hunting detectors.
If the detector spotted the daily fluctuation and the particles' paths proved consistent with the WIMP wind's direction, it could be compelling evidence that the signals came from dark matter.
Particle physics theory points toward weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, as one of the most likely candidates.
Explaining the architecture of the cosmos requires vast amounts of dark matter; observations and calculations suggest that the Milky Way galaxy, home to the solar system, sits within a huge cloud of weakly interacting massive particles, conveniently acronymized as WIMPs.