wagnerite

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Related to Wagnerian: Wagnerian soprano

wagnerite

[′väg·nə‚rīt]
(mineralogy)
Mg2(PO4)F A yellow, grayish, flash-red, or greenish, monoclinic mineral consisting of magnesium fluophosphate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Saint-Saens particularly loathed the Wagnerians because for them "music did not exist before the works of Wagner" (p.
Rarely has Cardiff enjoyed such a high-powered cultural weekend with the Kirov at Wales Millennium Centre and on Saturday night one of the world's truly great Wagnerian sopranos in concert at St David's Hall.
As prefigured in the Wagnerian Gesamtkunstwerk (in Theodor Adorno's prescient analysis) and achieved in the advent of sync-sound movies and television (as Jonathan Crary has speculated), techniques and technologies for conjoining sound and vision have been integrally allied with a regime of spectacle.
While the number of roles for operatic sopranos allows them to specialize as Wagnerian sopranos or Verdi sopranos, working mezzo-sopranos (whose range is a bit lower) must alter their vocal style to suit everything from Handel to Bizet.
These additions were made in a modern vocabulary following the Wagnerian geometry.
In such a tabulation, the delightfully carefree Field of Grass, bouncily performed to Harry Nilsson songs by a cast led by Patrick Corbin, would be pink, as might be the very different and sensuously beautiful Wagnerian love duets in the rhapsodic Roses.
His well-tried template for symphonic structure is much in evidence here: broad lyrical themes, subsequent jagged responses, weighty contrasts, melting loveliness, a Wagnerian conclusion to the first movement, a pastoralism in the scherzo which evokes Dvorak, and other Brucknerian characteristics beside.
This splendid account of Wagner's early score is one that any Wagnerian will want to add to his or her collection, and also because it restores a substantial and largely unknown cut in Lohengrin's "In fernem Land" in Act III.
The first chapter, on Strauss's "conversion" to Wagnerism, begins by fleshing out his relationship with Bayreuth in charting the conflicting versions of Wagnerian ideology that he encountered, concluding that by the early 1890s Strauss had developed a "dephilosophised attitude toward Wagner" (p.
In many ways, the piece has distinctly Wagnerian overtones.