waiver

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waiver

1. the voluntary relinquishment, expressly or by implication, of some claim or right
2. the act or an instance of relinquishing a claim or right
3. a formal statement in writing of such relinquishment
References in periodicals archive ?
Both waivers are based on the idea of "extreme hardship," which is why these waivers are also commonly referred to as "extreme hardship waivers.
TowerJazz uses the waiver flow to clean all the agreed waivers and show only real DRC errors that should be addressed.
With the addition of Illinois in April (the most recent to receive a waiver), 43 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have received waivers.
Past research has shown that in some cases waivered recruits do as well as, or better than, those who enter without waivers (Baldor 2008; Quester and Morse 2007).
By not enforcing parental preinjury waivers, it will be nearly impossible for organizations, whether nonprofit or for-profit, to assess and manage the risk as to any activities related to minors.
The Medicaid Waivers are crucial to the community life of individuals with significant disabilities and their families.
But we are extremely hopeful that the amount of available funding will increase as we begin to see successes from the waiver implementation.
TEI learned that additional guidance will address waivers in the case of disasters and new entities.
The Supreme Court indicated in its decision that the state Constitution for-bids the creation of judicial rules of waiver, even if the rules are promulgated pursuant to a legislative delegation of such power to the judiciary.
6 of this Guidance states that "it is no longer required to obtain a waiver from the Milestone Decision Authority to cite military specifications and standards in solicitations and contracts.
As politically savvy governors claimed success for their pilot projects, the waivers (and the social science research which supported their claims), undermined the institutional basis for welfare and resulted within a relatively short space of time in radical changes to the nation's federal social assistance program.
The IRS released the first tour rulings in October 2003; in three of them, it granted waivers for institutional errors.