Wajda


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Wajda

Andrei or Andrzej . born 1926, Polish film director. His films include Ashes and Diamonds (1958), The Wedding (1972), Man of Iron (1980), Danton (1982), and Miss Nobody (1997)
References in periodicals archive ?
Czech cinema has always been full of surprises for us," Wajda, 85, told AFP.
Having lost his own father in the Soviet massacre of Polish officers in the Katyn forest in 1940, Wajda waited for the demise of communism before dealing with this heartfelt issue in the way that he knows best - on film.
But still Wajda was able to veer from the Party line and create a more complex, neurotic, and (in one telling scene), antisemitic character, Jasio, who can shift from cravenness to being heroically intrepid while fighting the Nazis.
at 538-39 (stating business of betting or wagering under UIGEA does not include individual players); Shaker, supra note 23, at 1186 (discussing Wire Act provisions criminalizing business of gambling rather than act of gambling); UIGEA [section] 5364(d) (describing no-fault provision for blocked transactions); Wajda, supra note 32, at 332-33 (discussing UIGEA's burden on financial institutions).
The mass murder's cover-up lasted a half-century in Soviet-run Poland: not until 1989 was Wajda free to inscribe the year of his father's death on his tombstone.
Just earlier that year, Okazaki had taken a Japanese television crew to Gdansk, the birthplace of Walesa's labor group, and watched Andrzej Wajda direct the filming of ''Man of Iron.
Bouteflika, who lived for a while in Wajda on Morocco's eastern border with Algeria, is known to be frank to the point of being shocking.
Teresa Budzisz-Krzyzanowska (Krakow, 1989, directed by Andrzej Wajda, who was an outspoken opponent of the dying Communist regime) symbolized the power of the "individual conscience" (184) in Solidarity-era Poland.
Two of his novels, The Birch Grove and Young Maids from Wilko, also about death, either literally or in spirit, are known to world cinema thanks to Andrzej Wajda.
It owes its existence to the film and theatre director Andrzej Wajda, who donated his Kyoto Prize to establish it as a home for the Japanese art collection built up at the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by Feliks Jasienski.
The irony was that Wajda made the films under the oppressive hand of the Soviets.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: We would like to thank Jenn Mitchell, Kim Scott, and Hanna Wajda for their assistance in conducting this study.