Wajda


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Wajda

Andrei or Andrzej . born 1926, Polish film director. His films include Ashes and Diamonds (1958), The Wedding (1972), Man of Iron (1980), Danton (1982), and Miss Nobody (1997)
References in periodicals archive ?
We are facing a moment when the authorities are trying to influence art,' Wajda, who has criticized the Law and Justice (PiS) government on several occasions, told the local PAP news agency in September.
However, during a brief period of loosening of censorship in 1980, Wajda made "Man of Iron.
Czech cinema has always been full of surprises for us," Wajda, 85, told AFP.
Having lost his own father in the Soviet massacre of Polish officers in the Katyn forest in 1940, Wajda waited for the demise of communism before dealing with this heartfelt issue in the way that he knows best - on film.
Polish director Andrzej Wajda serves up a deeply personal take on one of the worst - and least known - atrocities of the Second World War.
From the legendary Polish director Andrzej Wajda, this moving and powerful film examines the cover up - and the horrific impact the mass murders had on those whose loved ones never returned.
A number of the directors have dealt with the Holocaust and the complex nature of Polish-Jewish relations--Polanski in The Pianist, Holland in Europa, Europa, and Angry Harvest, and Wajda in a number of works from his first film A Generation to Korczak, Holy Week and The Condemnation of Franciszek Klos.
The mass murder's cover-up lasted a half-century in Soviet-run Poland: not until 1989 was Wajda free to inscribe the year of his father's death on his tombstone.
Just earlier that year, Okazaki had taken a Japanese television crew to Gdansk, the birthplace of Walesa's labor group, and watched Andrzej Wajda direct the filming of ''Man of Iron.
Bouteflika, who lived for a while in Wajda on Morocco's eastern border with Algeria, is known to be frank to the point of being shocking.
It owes its existence to the film and theatre director Andrzej Wajda, who donated his Kyoto Prize to establish it as a home for the Japanese art collection built up at the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by Feliks Jasienski.
The irony was that Wajda made the films under the oppressive hand of the Soviets.