Wake Island


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Wake Island,

atoll with three islets (Wake, Wilkes, and Peale), 3 sq mi (7.8 sq km), central Pacific, between Hawaii and Guam. It is a U.S. military base and scientific research center under the jurisdiction of the Dept. of the Interior and the U.S. Air Force. There is no indigenous population. Wake Island was discovered by the Spanish in 1568, visited by the British in 1796 and named after Capt. William Wake, and annexed by the United States in 1898. The island became (1935) a commercial air station on the route to Asia and later served as a U.S. military base. In Dec., 1941, Wake Island was seized by the Japanese. U.S. forces bombed the island from 1942 until Japan's surrender in 1945. The atoll is also claimed by the Marshall Islands. Since 2009 it has been part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National MonumentPacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument,
c.490,000 sq mi (1,260,000 sq km), central Pacific Ocean; est. 2009. The monument comprises the waters and reefs surrounding seven islands and atolls, and in most cases the island lands are managed as wildlife refuges as well.
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Wake Island

 

an atoll in the Pacific Ocean, between the Hawaiian Islands and Guam; possession of the USA. Area, 7,700 sq km. Population, 1,000 (1969). Wake has an important airport on the transoceanic airline route of North America–Honolulu–Midway–Wake–Guam–Manila.

Wake Island

an atoll in the N central Pacific: claimed by the US in 1899; developed as a civil and naval air station in the late 1930s. Area: 8 sq. km (3 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
For the Wake Island project, a 40,000-pound pullback HDD unit was employed to drill three pilot holes beneath the sea floor and beyond the surf zone.
In Wake Island, the General Accounting Office (GAO) questioned a United States Air Force contract that was funded with O&M funds but provided for a three-year requirements contract to provide base maintenance services on Wake Island.
Most agreed that the United States should keep the smallest areas such as Puerto Rico, Guam, or Wake Island - the latter seized shortly after the end of the war - as bases, although in the case of Puerto Rico, both strategic and economic considerations entered into the equation.
Sightings of the reptiles have been reported in Okinawa, Wake Island, the Marshall Islands, Tinian, Rota, Diego Garcia, Texas and Spain.
The FIB-R-DOR[R] line currently makes up a large share of business, as sales expand nationally and internationally to such far away places as Wake Island, Puerto Rico and facilities in Europe and Asia.
These records of dispersal via air and ship traffic include: Oahu in the State of Hawaii, Saipan, Tinian, and Rota in the Mariana Islands, Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands, Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean, Okinawa in the Ryukyu Islands, Cocos Island south of Guam, and Wake Island in the central Pacific Ocean (Fritts 1987; 1988; McCoid & Stinson 1991).
Japanese forces also attacked Guam, Wake Island, the Philippines, and other strategic points in the Pacific at the same time Pearl Harbor was attacked.
New Mexico (BB-40) from 1936 to 1938; served in the Bureau of Personnel (1938-1939), then promoted to rear admiral and given command of Cruiser Division 3, Atlantic Fleet; given command of the Wake Island relief force (December 15, 1941), built around U.
Walker's group was in fact able to detect the January Kosrae earthquake and other large oceanic earthquakes because it has an array of 11 hydrophones situated near Wake Island in the center of the western Pacific.
The work at Wake Island is the 50th construction task order under Amec Foster Wheelers Sustainment, Rehabilitation & Modernization Task Order Contract (SATOC) with the Air Force.
But she is best known for as the first flight attendant who embarked on a 41-hour-long trans-Pacific flight that made stop overs in Wake Island, Guam, Johnston Atoll and Honolulu before landing in Oakland, California.