war driving


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Related to war driving: Bluejacking, piggybacking

war driving

Driving around an area with a laptop computer and an 802.11 wireless LAN adapter in order to find unsecured wireless LANs. When the laptop's wireless adapter (NIC) is set to promiscuous mode, it will receive any packets within its range. The goal is to find vulnerable sites either to obtain free Internet service or to potentially gain illegal access to the organization's data. See 802.11, Wi-Fi hotspot and war chalking.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dinwiddie County seeks quotes from commercial printing companies to print the County s Civil War Driving Tour Guide.
The BlueSecure intrusion-protection system includes a server application (BlueSecure Server) that provides WLAN administrators with an intuitive management interface to view all user activities, neighboring wireless LANs, rogue or unauthorized radio access points (AP), outside threats posed by war driving, and advanced correlation to detect wireless attacks.
THE Queen will come face to face with her Second World War driving licence when she opens a new Army museum in Winchester today.
While most war driving is a relatively harmless attempt to find free Internet access, improper security can cause exposure of entire corporate networks via the wireless access point.
Wal-Mart's defiance of German law has enraged the retail lobby, which accused the US retailer of fuelling a price war driving smaller competitors out of business.
A price war driving down the cost of the Direct Broadcast System (DBS) tiny satellite dish.
Distilling the essential political struggle to the conflict of two Virginia Republicans against two northern Federalists, Sharp concludes that the strife of 1798-1801 was primarily sectional, a dress rehearsal for the Civil War Driving an ever harder thesis as the book proceeds, Sharp virtually ignores the critical roles of southern Federalists and northern Republicans in the drama.
It automatically sets up leading access points and routers from D-Link, Linksys, and 3Com and blocks unauthorized access to Wi-Fi networks and encrypts the wireless data to protects its users from hacker and war driving attacks.
Wi-Fi Planet's "A War Driving Experience - Part I: The Results" by Eric Geier used AirMagnet Laptop Analyzer on a war drive to capture data on home and business wireless networks.
LucidLink software blocks unauthorized access to wireless networks, protecting users from hacker and war driving attacks.
1x authentication standard, Meetinghouse's AEGIS client/server software provides end-to-end user authentication in both wireless and wired LANs and guards against war driving and other potential attack methods.