Warwickshire

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Warwickshire

(wŏ`rĭkshĭr), county (1991 pop. 477,000), 975 sq mi (2,525 sq km), central England. The county seat is WarwickWarwick,
town (1991 pop. 21,701) and district, county seat of Warwickshire, central England, on the Avon River. The town has some commerce and manufacturing. Warwick is best known for Warwick Castle, located on the site of a fortress built by Æthelflæd, the daughter
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. Warwickshire is divided into five administrative districts: North Warwickshire, Nuneaton and Bedworth, Rugby, Warwick and Stratford-on-Avon. Historically, BirminghamBirmingham
, city and metropolitan borough (1991 pop. 934,900), central England. The city is equidistant from Bristol, Liverpool, Manchester, and London, England's main ports, and near the Black Country iron and coal deposits; it was connected to the Staffordshire mines by the
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, CoventryCoventry
, city and metropolitan borough (1991 pop. 318,718), central England. Coventry is an industrial center noted for its automobile production. Tractors, airplanes, machine tools, synthetic textiles, electrical equipment, and engineering products are also made.
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, and SolihullSolihull
, metropolitan borough (1991 pop. 195,100), central England, mainly a residential suburb of Birmingham. Automobiles, chemicals, and tools are manufactured. The 13th-century Church of St.
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 were also part of the county. The terrain is gently rolling, with outcroppings of the Cotswold Hills in the south. The Avon, flowing southwesterly, is the chief river. There are vestiges of the ancient Forest of Arden.

The region is a varied one, largely given to agriculture (wheat and other grains, dairying, sheep and cattle grazing). Some light industry is practiced. There are deposits of limestone and fireclay; coal is in the northeast. One of England's most known public schools is at RugbyRugby,
town (1991 pop. 59,039), Warwickshire, central England. An important railroad junction and engineering center, Rugby is the seat of one of England's most esteemed public schools.
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. Numerous traces of the Roman occupation remain, such as the abbeys of Merevale and Stoneleigh and the ruins of the castle at KenilworthKenilworth
, town (1991 pop. 16,782), Warwickshire, central England. A market town and bedroom community, it is famous for the ruins of Kenilworth Castle, celebrated in Sir Walter Scott's novel Kenilworth and founded c.1120 by Geoffrey de Clinton. In the 13th cent.
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. Warwick Castle is largely intact. The county is rich in literary associations as well. Shakespeare's birthplace at Stratford-upon-Avon (see under Stratford-on-AvonStratford-on-Avon,
district (2001 pop. 111,484), Warwickshire, central England, on the Avon River. The town and former borough of Stratford-upon-Avon is the administrative seat of the district, which also includes towns of Alcester, Shipston-on-Stour, and Southam.
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) is one of England's most popular literary attractions. In 1974, Warwickshire was reorganized as a nonmetropolitan county.

Warwickshire

 

a county in the central part of England, Great Britain. Warwickshire covers an area of 2,500 sq km; under the new administrative division of 1974–75, its area was reduced when it no longer included the cities of Birmingham, Coventry, Solihull, and Sutton Coldfield. Population, approximately 500,000 (1973). Agriculture is the predominant economic sector. Coal is mined near Nuneaton. Machine tools, electrical engineering equipment, and motor vehicle and airplane parts are manufactured in the cities of Warwick, Nuneaton, and Rugby.

Warwickshire

a county of central England: until 1974, when the West Midlands metropolitan county was created, it contained one of the most highly industrialized regions in the world, centred on Birmingham. Administrative centre: Warwick. Pop.: 519 300 (2003 est.). Area: 1981 sq. km (765 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
The McConnells stayed with broadcaster Kirsty Wark, her husband Alan Clements and family at their villa over New Year in 2002/3 and again in 2004/5.
JACK McConnell's office last night dismissed as 'complete b *** cks' claims that he had influenced an pounds 80k contract awarded to a firm run by his friend Kirsty Wark.
It emerged yesterday the TV presenter's company, Wark Clements, were given an pounds 80,000 Executive contract in 2003 to create an education website.
He never discusses business with either Kirsty Wark or her husband Alan Clements.
Mr McConnell and Ms Wark insist - and might even believe - that criticism of their holiday is a 'storm in a very small teacup'.
He must properly address the issues raised by Lord Fraser with a statement laying bare his friendship with Wark.
But after discussions with the BBC, it was agreed they could go ahead if Ms Wark did not do any work about Holyrood on Newsnight.
The First Minister's spokesman said: 'We can confirm that the Wark family have stayed at Bute House twice.
Yesterday, Tory MSP Brian Monteith called on the BBC to sack Wark.
NEWSNIGHT presenter Kirsty Wark and her family enjoyed lavish overnight stays at Jack McConnell's official mansion, the Mirror can reveal.
Wark and her husband Alan Clements invited McConnell and his family to their villa in Majorca for New Year.
If there is an invitation from Kirsty Wark he will consider it.