warm

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warm

1. (of colours) predominantly red or yellow in tone
2. (of a scent, trail, etc.) recently made; strong
3. near to finding a hidden object or discovering or guessing facts, as in children's games
References in periodicals archive ?
Michal Todorovic of Warm and Fuzzy Logic, +1-949-706-1420; NOTE TO EDITORS: If you would like additional information on ShadowBack or Warm and Fuzzy Logic, please view the Warm and Fuzzy Press Center at http://www.
Jesus did not say to Simon Peter: "Thou art Warm and Fuzzy, and upon this feeling of indiscriminate affirmation I will build my Church.
The Chapman brothers' puerile toy-soldier fantasies and Darger's nigh-pedophiliac perversions could have made a genuinely interesting intervention under the sign "Almost Warm and Fuzzy," while Friedman, Kelley, Dingle, et al.
According to Catlett, "Consumers need to see more than just a warm and fuzzy seal on the corporate vaults that contain their personal information.
They are not the warm and fuzzy family entertainment that the public believes they are.
CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--June 12, 1995--Chicago-based North American Bear Company (Nabco) thinks a rival toymaker's motives may not be so warm and fuzzy.
A When a relatively new employee plops down in front of his manager and goes through a litany of problems and fixes, the managerial response is not typically warm and fuzzy.
This series would no doubt go down with viewers more easily were it an hourlong show - hourlongs are allowed crasser central characters and bleakly comic premises, while, for some reason, situation comedies are uniformly expected to be warm and fuzzy affairs.
But love - true romance - is forever warm and fuzzy.
Give his tummy a squeeze and you'll be treated to raspy growls of ``I got your warm and fuzzy right here'' and ``God, you're a moron,'' among nearly two dozen other less-printable sentiments.
Equally disastrous has been the exile of traditional math in favor of dubious experiments in the impressive-sounding but ineffectual new math, more recently followed by the warm and fuzzy ``Let us all get together and make a good estimate
Harold'' is a longish evening that careens from the blackest of black humor to near slapstick, ultimately to warm and fuzzy sentiments of life affirmation.