Warwick


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Warwick,

town (1991 pop. 21,701) and district, county seat of Warwickshire, central England, on the Avon River. The town has some commerce and manufacturing. Warwick is best known for Warwick Castle, located on the site of a fortress built by Æthelflæd, the daughter of King Alfred, in 915. The castle was begun in the 14th cent. and was converted into a mansion in the 17th cent. St. Mary's Church there dates partly from the 12th cent.; partially burned in 1694, it was redesigned by William Wilson, a pupil of Christopher WrenWren, Sir Christopher,
1632–1723, English architect. A mathematical prodigy, he studied at Oxford. He was professor of astronomy at Gresham College, London, from 1657 to 1661, when he became Savilian professor of astronomy at Oxford.
..... Click the link for more information.
. The Beauchamp Chapel (1443–64) is noteworthy. In the church are a Norman crypt and monuments to Richard de Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, to his countess, and to Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester. Within the district, Royal Leamington Spa is a popular health resort.

Warwick

(wôr`wĭk, wŏ`rĭk), city (1990 pop. 85,427), Kent co., central R.I., at the head of Narragansett Bay; settled by Samuel GortonGorton, Samuel,
c.1592–1677, Anglo-American religious leader, founder of Warwick, R.I., b. near Manchester, England. Seeking religious freedom, he emigrated to America (1637) but, because of his unorthodox religious teachings, was banished successively from Boston and
..... Click the link for more information.
e 1642, inc. as a city 1931. Its long important textile industry, now closed, dated from 1794. Current manufactures include machinery, metals, pipes and tubing, and silverware. The town includes the villages of Apponaug, on Greenwich Bay; Hillsgrove, site of the state airport; Warwick; and several former resort areas. Warwick village was nearly destroyed (1676) in King Philip's WarKing Philip's War,
1675–76, the most devastating war between the colonists and the Native Americans in New England. The war is named for King Philip, the son of Massasoit and chief of the Wampanoag. His Wampanoag name was Metacom, Metacomet, or Pometacom.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Gaspee Point, S of Pawtuxet, was the scene of the burning of the British revenue cutter GaspeeGaspee
, British revenue cutter, burned (June 10, 1772) at Namquit (now Gaspee) Point in the present-day city of Warwick on the western shore of Narragansett Bay, R.I. The vessel arrived in Mar.
..... Click the link for more information.
 in 1772; annual "Gaspee Days" commemorate the event. Warwick has a very large music arena and an amusement park. Nathanael GreeneGreene, Nathanael,
1742–86, American Revolutionary general, b. Potowomut (now Warwick), R.I. An iron founder, he became active in colonial politics and served (1770–72, 1775) in the Rhode Island assembly.
..... Click the link for more information.
 was born in the city.

Warwick

 

a city in the northeastern USA, in the state of Rhode Island, on Narragansett Bay of the Atlantic Ocean. A southern suburb of Providence. Population, 90,000 (1974). Warwick has light industry, as well as metalworking and foodprocessing industries. Commercial fishing is carried out in the area. Seaside resort areas are nearby.

Warwick

1
Earl of, title of Richard Neville, known as the Kingmaker. 1428--71, English statesman. During the Wars of the Roses, he fought first for the Yorkists, securing the throne (1461) for Edward IV, and then for the Lancastrians, restoring Henry VI (1470). He was killed at Barnet by Edward IV

Warwick

2
a town in central England, administrative centre of Warwickshire, on the River Avon: 14th-century castle, with collections of armour and waxworks: the university of Warwick (1965) is in Coventry. Pop.: 23 350 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
The second half started in the same vein as the first, with Warwick enjoying a lot of possession but unable to turn this into goal-scoring opportunities.
En route, Warwick gets stranded 40ft up a pole at Derbyshire Mountain Rescue.
I'm blown away,'' said the 33-year-old Warwick, an independent audio engineer who lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Ashley Warwick.
Opening of the first phase of the Warwick Doha Hotel with 164 rooms and suites will be during current year, and the hotel capacity will reach 250 rooms and suites by the end of 2017.
The 2013 Warwick Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity.
The businesses included in the deal were Warwick France, Warwick Italy, Warwick Spain, Warwick Portugal, Warwick Technology (Slovenia), and GME Chemicals (Malaysia).
Neither Atlas nor Warwick have reported Mineral Resources on some of their DSO projects and any discussion in relation to exploration targets is conceptual in nature.
Anne Wordsworth, Target; and Alison Harley, UWSP of Warwick Science Park David Grindrod, UWSP; Chris Moore, Identity Print & Marketing; and Amrik Dhabra, ADECS Russell Smith and Tracey Marr, both of Business Boffins; and Elaine Pollard and Sharon West, both of Warwick Business School Elaine Pollard, Margi Levy, and Sharon West, all of Warwick Business School Howard Anderson, Chamber of Commerce; Richard Crooks, Business Link; Sue Bennett, Warwick University; Iona Thomson, and Sian Lawrence, both of Warwick Business School Sam Hardy, University of Warwick HRI; Richard Comer, Connect Midlands; Ederyn Williams, Warwick Ventures; and Russell Munslow, UWSP
Warwick Grove will consist of an estimated 215 units and is situated on a 130-acre wooded site nestled between County Route 17-A and Forester Avenue, in the historic village of Warwick.
Federal electronic currency, or FEDEC, would cripple "underground illicit activities" and "generate billions of dollars in previously unreported tax revenues," Warwick exults.
The Warwick Hotel was widely condemned this week and clearly suffered severe reputational harm for its decision to host Ahmadinejad and the Iranian delegation.