WAAS

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WAAS

[wäs or ¦dəb·əl·yü¦ā¦ā′es]

WAAS

(Wide Area Augmentation System) A system of earth stations and satellites that improves the tracking accuracy of the GPS navigation system to approximately 10 feet. Deployed in 2003, WAAS comprises a group of 25 reference stations and two satellites that cover North America. The stations track the GPS satellites and send correction signals to the WAAS satellites, which transmit them to WAAS-enabled receivers. See GPS augmentation system and GPS.
References in classic literature ?
Harvey considered affairs, wondered that he was not deathly sick, and crawled into his bunk again, as the softest and safest place, while Dan struck up, "I don't want to play in your yard," as accurately as the wild jerks allowed.
If I was you, when I come to Gloucester I would give two, three big candles for my good luck.
About tin years back I was crew to a Sou' Boston market-boat.
There was war between the man and the boy ever since Dan had discovered that the mere whistling of that tune would make him angry as he heaved the lead.
It was a singular trade, obeying no known commercial or economic principles--indeed, no principles.
It was always a very rhetorical and often a trying affair, but in these progressive times you have to make a noise to get a living.
The High Road from London to Brighton that ran through Bun Hill was like the British Empire or the British Constitution--a thing that had grown to its present importance.
Hens, however, were out of the question; there was no place for a run unless they had it in the shop.
for he clearly saw the intention of his journey); and what greatly aggravated his concern was, that Mrs Honour, who had promised to inquire after Sophia, and to make her report to him early the next evening, had disappointed him.
In the situation that he and his mistress were in at this time, there were scarce any grounds for him to hope that he should hear any good news; yet he was as impatient to see Mrs Honour as if he had expected she would bring him a letter with an assignation in it from Sophia, and bore the disappointment as ill.
Which temper Jones was now in, we leave the reader to guess, having no exact information about it; but this is certain, that he had spent two hours in expectation, when, being unable any longer to conceal his uneasiness, he retired to his room; where his anxiety had almost made him frantick, when the following letter was brought him from Mrs Honour, with which we shall present the reader
to blam, had I not excepted of it when her lashipp was so veri kind