wasteland

(redirected from Waste land)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms.

wasteland

a barren or desolate area of land, not or no longer used for cultivation or building
References in periodicals archive ?
In the years following the publication of "The Waste Land," Eliot would separate from his wife, renounce his American citizenship for British citizenship, undergo a religious conversion and become an Anglo-Catholic, and also become the dominant figure in 20thcentury English literature, a Nobel laureate, and a conservative-minded critic of Western civilization's post-religious decline.
In the first part of The Waste Land, We have four voices and speakers:
The intoxicated figure of Dmitri Karamazov whom Eliot alludes to in The Waste Land is the Asiatic par excellence given his connection to Dionysus, the god of wine whose doubling in the eyes of Pentheus is in view of his being god and the devil, the primal "demiurge," a figure beyond the realm of opposites, who is simultaneously nothing and everything (Hesse 324).
The awful shadow of some unseen Power" is closely echoed at the end of The Waste Land (1922) when Eliot describes "The awful daring of a moment's surrender.
To add insult to injury, the entrance to this waste land is very close to a large sign directing you to 'free car park'.
The appearance of Lawrence Rainey's scholarly new edition of the poem--The Annotated Waste Land with Eliot's Contemporary Prose--serves to sharpen this paradox.
In Ash-Wednesday and Four Quartets Eliot moves beyond the agnosticism of The Waste Land to reunite poetry and belief.
The options have been a purpose-built theatre constructed on waste land near Tower Bridge, or the soon-to-be refurbished Lyceum Theatre in Covent Garden, which is too small to be ideal.
Eliot versified in The Waste Land about the vulgar suburbanites coming to work--"Unreal City,/Under the brown fog of a winter dawn,/A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many,/I had not thought death had undone so many"--he required two footnote references, one to Baudelaire and the other to the Inferno, III, 55-57.
RESIDENTS of Wyken Way want to stop the building of ten houses on waste land and houses have to be demolished to make way for a road.
Because of what you were involved in, one gun was found on waste land and the other gun is still missing.
The development in Tranmere involved affordable housing being built on former waste land in Seymour Street.

Full browser ?