Energy recovery

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Energy recovery

A process that creates electricity and heat, such as combustion, from waste or materials that would have otherwise been disposed in a landfill.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report will answer questions such as: - What are the prospects for the overall Waste-to-Energy industry?
This analysis should conclude with an outlook on waste-to-energy developments taking into account market conditions at present and in the near future.
According to Al Harthy, a 2013 study commissioned by Bee'ah ascertained that calorific components in waste included plastic, cartons and paper which, once burned, can generate an average of 10 mega joules of energy per kilo of waste - a value that is "excellent" for a Waste-to-Energy scheme centring on the desalination of seawater to meet the country's growing potable water needs, he said.
According to Avfall Sverige's CEO, Weine Wiqvist, supportive policy frameworks helped accelerate the adoption of waste-to-energy in his home country.
Waste-to-energy is one of the cleanest sources of energy and one of the most efficient ways to treat municipal solid waste.
As of 2010, America's solid waste industry operated 86 waste-to-energy facilities in 24 states.
0 technology, the Waste-to-Energy plant is will generate electricity as well as provide heat for a sludge drying operation.
Americas Waste-To-Energy (AW2E) will be the operating company that manages the contracts in Brazil and the Dominican Republic while the parent company GW2E will manage the contract for Kyrgyzstan.
California has granted $57 million since 1998 to 28 firms, and the feds spent $95 million on waste-to-energy research last year.
Increasing research and development on recycling, source reduction; waste-to-energy incineration, and so forth.
The intensifying quest for alternatives to fossil fuels and the need to bridge the energy demand and supply gap has opened up new avenues for the waste-to-energy plant market.
1) The report provides detailed profiles of 12 leading companies operating within the Waste-to-Energy market: