water right

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water right

[′wȯd·ər ‚rīt]
(engineering)
The right to use water for mining, agricultural, or other purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
1918) (permitting the watermaster, in regulating adjudicated rights, to allow an increase above the adjudicated rate of up to 20% for loss by seepage and evaporation).
number of watermasters and assistants has dropped almost every year since
He works as the technical and design manager at Watermaster Qatar W.
But the watermaster, Michael Mattick, has reversed course and rescinded the order after city officials gathered evidence that Westfir held a long-forgotten water right that had been secured by the old mill almost a century ago, predating the water right established for the river's fish.
Transportable in one piece on a flat-bed truck, the Watermaster is amphibious and can "walk" itself into the pond or sump to be cleaned.
Though Watermaster is very well known in the dredging industry it is still relatively unknown and represents a new way of working for the many construction companies in the Middle East.
WaterMaster and AquaMaster are part of ABB's FlowMaster range of electromagnetic meters for flow measurement in industrial processes, water and wastewater management, and the food and life science industries.
But Mark Mackowski, the current watermaster, said not enough has been done in the intervening four years.
The WaterMaster hydration system features the larger OMEGA fill port.
The data on water rights are compiled from the Idaho District 1 Watermaster report (IDWR, 1994, tables 21-25).
The Rio Grande watermaster (RGW) office is charged with monitoring the use, allocating the water, and enforcing those water rights laws and regulations established by the Hidalgo decision [State of Texas v.
Southern California groundwater users had to agree to regulate and equitably pay for their groundwater use through a watermaster authority hired by them, or face saltwater intrusion, depleted local groundwater, court battles, and the greater expense of importing water [Blomquist 1992].