Watson-Watt


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Watson-Watt

Sir Robert Alexander. 1892--1973, Scottish physicist, who played a leading role in the development of radar
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Robert Watson-Watt put together and managed a team of brilliant scientists and electronic engineers to develop this observation to make it a useful tool.
However, if anyone can claim to have "invented" radar, then the accolade must go to Watson-Watt, who was initially asked to invent a "death ray" to shoot down enemy aircraft.
In this feature-length drama he plays Robert Watson-Watt, the Scottish meteorologist who, with a group of his weatherman colleagues, invented radar - the first means of spotting enemy planes while they were still far enough away to intercept.
CASTLES IN THE SKY Thur BBC2 9pm Eddie Izzard takes centre stage in this fact-based drama about radar pioneer Sir Robert Watson-Watt and his team of unknown scientists whose invention played a critical part in the Second World War.
A Butterflies B Horses C Bricks D Fishing flies QUESTION 9 - for 9 points: Which wartime invention earned Robert Watson-Watt a knighthood in 1942?
Hugh Dowding, the man in charge of the RAF's Fighter Command and Robert Watson-Watt, the inventor of the then new-fangled radar which sent the Spitfires and Hurricanes swooping on the enemy, were two of Scotia's greatest - yet too often unsung - sons.
1935: Robert Watson-Watt gave the first demonstration of radar in Daventry.
At Edinburgh's Film Festival, Castles in the Sky by director Gillies Mackinnon (I was in the first film he ever made), tells the story of Robert Watson-Watt who invented radar.
Which invention by Robert Watson-Watt was of crucial importance in the Battle of Britain?
Also on This Day: 1797: The Bank of Englandissued the first pound note; 1802: Birth of French writer Victor Hugo;1846: Birth of American Western hero William 'Buffalo Bill' Cody; 1935: Robert Watson-Watt first demonstrated radar at Daventry; 1952: Winston Churchill announced that Britain had produced its own atomic bomb.
So far, the Cathedral City is best known as the birthplace of the inventor of radar, Sir Robert Watson-Watt, in 1892.