weather vane

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weather vane

or

wind vane,

instrument used to indicate wind direction. It consists of an asymmetrically shaped object, e.g., an arrow or a rooster, mounted at its center of gravity so it can move freely about a vertical axis. Regardless of the design, the portion of the object with greater surface area (usually the tail) offers greater resistance to the wind and thus positions the vane so that the forward part points in the direction from which the wind is blowing. The compass direction of the wind may then be determined by reference to an attached compass rose; alternatively, the orientation of the vane may be relayed to a remote calibrated dial. The wind vane must be mounted at a distance from the nearest obstacle equal to at least twice the height of the obstacle above the vane if the observed wind direction is to be representative of meteorologically significant wind patterns; for this reason, the vane is often mounted on a pole or tower that is in turn mounted on the roof of a tall building.

weather vane

A metal plate, often decorated, or in the shape of a figure or object, which rotates freely on a vertical spindle to indicate wind direction; usually located atop a spire or other elevated position on a building.

weather vane

weather vane
A device that shows the direction the wind is blowing.

weather vane

a vane designed to indicate the direction in which the wind is blowing
References in periodicals archive ?
And I don't mean a slight adjustment in the direction of the church weather cock, but your actual global warming, which is poised to consign herbaceous borders to the compost heap of history.
Like a sudden shift in a weather cock, the auction marks a dramatic change in direction for the farm: as well as the 150 agricultural bygones, Mr Hughes and his wife Jo will be selling off their 201-head, TB-free dairy herd which they founded in September 1966.
My silence encourages her to bellow the question again, causing the weather cock on the nearby church spire to spin frantically in search of acoming storm.