portal

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portal

1. an entrance, gateway, or doorway, esp one that is large and impressive
2. Anatomy
a. of or relating to a portal vein
b. of or relating to a porta

Portal

An entrance, gate, or door to a building or courtyard, often decorated; it marks the transition from the public exterior to the private interior space.

Portal

 

in architecture, an opening, usually an entrance into a building. Typical ancient Egyptian and ancient Greek portals were simply ornamented and had level crosspieces. In ancient Mesopotamia portals were arched, and in the Near and Middle East peshtak portals were typical; these were rectangular and had a cut-out lancet arch. Beginning in the 11th century arched, or perspective, portals became widespread in romanesque, gothic, and ancient Russian architecture. These portals were projections whose corners had columns joined by archivolts. Renaissance and baroque portals usually had pilasters and columns that supported the entablature or frontal.

portal

[′pȯrd·əl]
(anatomy)
Of or pertaining to the porta hepatis.
Pertaining to the portal vein or system.
(engineering)
A redundant frame consisting of two uprights connected by a third member at the top.
(mining engineering)
An entrance to a mine.
The rock face at which a tunnel is started.

portal

1. An impressive or monumental entrance, gate, or door to a building or courtyard, often decorated.
2. A structural framework consisting of a beam supported by two columns to which it is connected with sufficient rigidity to hold virtually unchanged the original angles between the intersecting members. (See illustration p. 752.)

PORTAL

(1)
Process-Oriented Real-Time Algorithmic Language.

["PORTAL - A Pascal-based Real-Time Programming Language", R. Schild in Algorithmic Languages, J.W. deBakker et al eds, N-H 1981].

portal

(World-Wide Web)
A website that aims to be an entry point to the World-Wide Web, typically offering a search engine and/or links to useful pages, and possibly news or other services. These services are usually provided for free in the hope that users will make the site their default home page or at least visit it often. Popular examples are Yahoo and MSN. Most portals on the Internet exist to generate advertising income for their owners, others may be focused on a specific group of users and may be part of an intranet or extranet. Some may just concentrate on one particular subject, say technology or medicine, and are known as a vertical portals.

portal

A Web "supersite" that provides a variety of services including Web search, news, blogs, discussion groups, shopping and links to other sites. The major general-purpose portals are Yahoo, MSN and AOL, all of which offer free Web-based e-mail accounts. TV networks and newspapers provide general-purpose portals, but not e-mail. Many portals allow the home page to be personalized (see personal portal). Prior to the Web, CompuServe and AOL functioned as portals, aggregating information from various sources.

The Vortal
Portals also serve vertical markets. Trade magazines, associations and special interest groups host vertical portals (vortals) and provide news and articles for their industry such as IT, banking and insurance. The vortal may also include general information such as top news stories and weather; however, their search capabilities are often limited to their own archives, rather than the entire Web. See corporate portal, business intelligence portal and portal server.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through a combination of discussions, critiques of existing Web portals, brainstorming, and pen and paper drawings, the team designed a low-tech prototype Web portal over multiple sessions.
The literature provides numerous examples of web portals that are created and maintained by libraries (Gibbons, 2003; Morgan, 2003; Ghaphery, 2002; Pace, 2001; Goodvin & Smith, 2000).
The project manager has visibility of all dialogues that happen on the web portal which allows for control and accountability.
Real-world examples of how the internet is changing tool design can be found on the websites of suppliers of mold bases, hot runners, and other mold components--the likes of D-M-E, Gunther, Hasco, Husky, Incoe, Mold-Masters, PCS, and Progressive Components, to name a few-which have brought do-it-yourself capabilities to their web portals.
Also, a technology use and teaching effectiveness survey was administered in the middle of the semester to gather student feedback on the perceived impact of the Web portal on their learning.
We also enter 2007 with plans to bring our Company online for the first time with our new micro-sites and our coming Web portal.
The first new services are expected to launch in early 2007, and Vermont Information Consortium is currently working with state agencies and the Vermont Web Portal Board to identify and prioritize new applications to be introduced during the first year of the contract.
The new Web portal enables the agency to continue its efforts to eliminate immigration case backlogs, and improve customer services, while increasing data transparency for other government agencies.
The CSX offers advanced VoIP services, legacy voice services, and personalized control of features via the Switchmaxx Unified Self-Care Web portal and applications web-based interface.
Using our Web portal, customers can completely manage the capacity allocated to each of their local numbers.
This follows months of research and development based upon substantial product feedback from leading ISPs and web portals, and the company is encouraged by its sales prospects for the remainder of 2006.
Connect provides tools to design, track and manage e-mail campaigns, personalized Web portal pages, mail communication, and with the addition of Tele-Center, phone campaigns.