Weber's law


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Weber's law

[′vā·bərz ‚lȯ]
(physiology)
The law that the stimulus increment which can barely be detected (the just noticeable difference) is a constant fraction of the initial magnitude of the stimulus; this is only an approximate rule of thumb.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this section, we first review Weber's Law and then propose the Contour Angle Feature (CAF).
The failure of Weber's law in time perception and production.
In fact, it has been shown mathematically that when the centers of the magnitude distributions vary as a power function of the stimuli, Ekman's law implies Weber's law and vice versa (Norwich & Wong, 1997; Petrov & Anderson, 2005).
As Nagle (1987) notes, application of Weber's Law to pricing issues is highly controversial.