Wedgwood


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Related to Wedgwood: Josiah Wedgwood

Wedgwood

1
a. pottery produced, esp during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, at the Wedgwood factories
b. such pottery having applied classical decoration in white on a blue or other coloured ground

Wedgwood

2
Josiah. 1730--95, British potter and industrialist, who founded several pottery works near Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire
References in periodicals archive ?
After the visit you can relax with a cuppa in the Wedgwood Tea Room and choose from more than 50 blends of tea.
An aspect of the Wedgwood story that has not always received sufficient attention--the firm's enormous impact elsewhere in Europe--was explored by ceramic historian George Savage in the September 1959 issue of Apollo.
Photo The Wedgwood Museum/Phil Sayer In 1762, he met Thomas Bentley, a successful merchant with a wide and cultivated taste who had the right social contacts and a knowledge of the arts that gave him an eye for design.
The collection contains more than 80,000 works of art, ceramics, manuscripts and letters, pattern books and photographs covering the 250-year history of Wedgwood.
Photo The Phil Sayer ON SALE THIS highly decorative Wedgwood Jasperware calyx-krater shaped vase and cover decorated typically in relief with classical subjects, circa 1900, is one of a number of pieces on sale at Chester Antiques Show.
The Art Fund, said the Save Wedgwood appeal had been the fastest ever fundraising campaign in the charity's 111-year history.
Wedgwood has specially created the Langham Rose tea ware exclusively for The Langham Hotels for "The Langham Afternoon Tea with Wedgwood" experience.
The historic Wedgwood Collection in Stoke-on-Trent could be split up and sold after the historic firm collapsed
The current plight of the Wedgwood Museum in Staffordshire makes for a sad contrast, with the priceless inventory at risk after a calamitous legal finding in December, 2011 led to the terms of the charitable trust being reinterpreted retrospectively.
Wedgwood was a perfectionist, however, and he paid innumerable visits to the printers to express his displeasure personally whenever their work failed to meet his standard.
Wedgwood were praised for their "remarkable consistency" and high quality of both food and service.
Edward Knight's Wedgwood china is important to us because it has survived, and because we know Jane Austen must have used it during her visits to her brother's home.