Weep hole


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weep hole

[′wēp ‚hōl]
(civil engineering)
A hole in a wood sill, retaining wall, or other structure to allow accumulated water to escape.

Weep hole

A small opening in a wall or window member, through which accumulated condensation or water may drain to the building exterior, such as from the base of a cavity wall flashing or a skylight.

weep hole

1. A small opening in a wall or window member, through which accumulated condensation or water may drain to the building exterior, as from the base of a cavity wall, a wall flashing, or a skylight.
2. A hole near the bottom of a retaining wall, backfilled with gravel or other free-draining material, to permit water to drain to the outside of the wall, so as to prevent the buildup of pressure behind the wall.
References in periodicals archive ?
Earth Work, Rcc,Pcc, Rigid Smooth, Fi Finish, Weep Hole And Rough Stone Dry Packing Etc
If you don't see a steady stream of clean water exiting the weep hole, poke a wire hanger into the hole, or spray it out with compressed air, and wet it down again.
Sometimes mineral precipitation or other impurities from the water will accumulate and cause the weep hole in the flush valve to stay open longer than it should, so it's using 2.
Notes: The weep hole is drilled above the foot valve, but a good distance below the frost line.
The thin layer of shotcrete rendered the weep hole useless as a pressure relief system.
Easley recommends putting a weep hole after every other brick, both at the base of the wall and over doors and windows.
000050" thick gold plated beryllium copper center contacts with plating weep hole, a nail head featu re with tapered lead-in for center wire, and positive tactile feedback upon engaging with the dielectric.
Two spring-loaded clips secure it in place, and a small weep hole is drilled through the PVC under it to allow for ventilation and to prevent condensation.
Inside the boot there is a weep hole that needs proper cleaning.
The holes should be fitted with screens to prevent insects from using the weep hole as entranceways.
To cover all bases, clever masons will install a piece of rope that runs behind the brick and out through a weep hole at the base of the wall.
Brumfield recommends demanding full head joints and eliminating the fancy weep hole designs; instead, allow the bricklayer to leave out head joints entirely every 2 feet or so to act as the wall's drainage system [ILLUSTRATION FOR SKETCH 2B OMITTED].