weeping willow

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Related to Weeping Willows: Salix babylonica

weeping willow

a hybrid willow tree, Salix alba × S. babylonica, known as S. alba var. tristis, having long hanging branches: widely planted for ornament

weeping willow

symbolizes grief at loss. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 178]
See: Grief
References in periodicals archive ?
That old swimming hole, the yellow, speckled meadow and the giant weeping willows are long gone; high-rise condominiums have taken their place.
Tip: While Weeping Willows are beautiful, they should not be planted within 50- 75feet of water or sewer lines since their waterseeking roots can cause problems.
The weeping willow is a tree most people have considered planting at one time or another.
Steps lead down to the lower garden with more level lawns, weeping willow and a small jetty with mooring rights.
Camera (color), Anders Bohman; editor, Bernhard Winkler; music, Popsicle, Weeping Willows, others; production designer, Jack van Domburg; costume designer, Moa Li Lemhagen Schalin.
The drawing specifies "trees common to NY region" such as weeping willows, plus "bushes, rock, moss, earth and path.
One of the two weeping willows stands over a long-dried pond circled by nettles, whose sting eagerly anticipates the brush of naked flesh.
Needless to say, I now refer to weeping willows as Kissing Trees and it does seem to suit them.
This was no bad thing, actually, as it made the weeping willows and reflections in the lake seem to be all the more atmospheric.
Tall weeping willows watch over the site, Giving shelter by day and roosting at night, Like giant mother hens, with branches that keep, Their perching brood safe as at night time they sleep.
The fairy glen and stepping stones, the annual conker competitions and the boating lakes at both Sefton and Greenbank parks with the weeping willows and variety of ducks and birds - it was our classroom, too, for nature walks.
The pounds 5,000 project will see a line of 30 weeping willows planted along the banks of the River Trent, close to its confluence with the River Tame, at the 150-acre arboretum near Alrewas, Staffordshire.