Wehrmacht


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Wehrmacht

 

the name for the armed forces of fascist Germany from 1935 to 1945. The basis for the creation and development of the Wehrmacht was the Reichswehr, renamed Wehrmacht after the introduction of universal compulsory military service on Mar. 16, 1935. The Wehrmacht was headed by the Supreme High Command (OKW), to which were subordinated the land forces (das Heer),the air force (die Luftwaffe), and the navy (die Kriegsmarine). At the heads of these forces were high commands (OKH, OKL, OKM, and, from 1940, the SS forces) and the corresponding service commanders in chief. The supreme commander in chief of the Wehrmacht was Chancellor A. Hitler. On the eve of World War II, the Wehrmacht numbered about 3 million men. Its maximum strength was about 11 million men (December 1943).

References in periodicals archive ?
The Wehrmacht has long had a reputation as the "clean" branch of the German military service, seemingly set apart from the Waffen-SS that committed many of the crimes Germany was guilty of in the Second World War.
Norman Ohler asegura que conocemos ya todos los aspectos del nazismo y de la Wehrmacht, pero que, en cambio, no alcanzamos a comprenderlo integramente.
They will act in the same manner as the Wehrmacht officers during World War II.
The book is divided into five chapters; these cover historical background, the role of priests and seminarians in the Wehrmacht, the justifications and situations of priests, and the justifications and results for the German Catholic Church.
Franz JosefMerkl shows that former Wehrmacht judges were prominently involved in repeatedly acquitting the SS general, Max Simon, of war crimes.
Big Al, Glasgow A The dark-haired one from Abba was born Anni-Frid Synni Lyngstad in Norway to a German dad who was a Wehrmacht soldier in the World War II-occupied country and a Norwegian mum.
Husband served in the Wehrmacht and sons joined the Hitler Youth; congregations prayed for a German victory when the war began; Jewish references were carefully scrubbed from hymnals, lesson plans, and liturgical practices.
The ceremony in Vienna was attended by municipal dignitaries and some of those who had deserted the Wehrmacht.
Because the Wehrmacht resented the formation of the Waffen-SS, it blocked SS authorities from ordering new small arms at the beginning of the war.
On July 20, 1944, a group of Wehrmacht officers led by Stauffenberg tried to kill Hitler by leaving a bomb in one of his headquarters, known as the "Wolfsschanze" (Wolf's Lair).
Service in the "total institution" of the Wehrmacht "established[ed] a specific form of socialization, in which group norms and responsibilities ha[d] far more influence on individuals than under normal social conditions" (16).