weight function

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weight function

[′wāt ‚fəŋk·shən]
(mathematics)
Two real valued functions ƒ and g are orthogonal relative to a weight function σ on an interval if the integral over the interval of ƒ· g ·σ vanishes.
A function defined on the edges of a network or the arcs of a directed network, whose value at each edge or arc is the unique nonnegative integer assigned to that edge or arc.
A function defined on the vertices of a generalized s-t network, whose value at each vertex is a nonnegative integer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The weighting function calculates weights using the document statistics and stores them in lookup tables.
Another difference from other studies on this topic and an advantage in the GWLR technique involves the use of different samples in developing each local model, giving greater weight to borrowers who are closer geographically, and not using distant information that is outside the radius defined by the weighting function.
According to Ramsay & Silverman (2005) this technique summarizes the variability of the data in the few principal functions understanding this as the weighting function of the variability of the data which is more easily manipulated.
2] is the weighted mathematical model, and W is the weighting function that is a function of the front ground clearance.
For example, the weighting function used to account for poor soil aeration was:
It is possible for a decision maker to have a probability weighting function with both concave and convex components, and the conventional wisdom is that the function is concave for smaller probabilities and convex for larger probabilities.
1](s) is a stable weighting function that reflects frequency spectrum of disturbances at low frequencies.
These attitudes are expressed by individual transformed probability weighting function, h(D).
BAS (1,1,1,1): the proposed weighting function with n = 1, [[alpha].
Any correlation between CCT and optical safety, material safety and photobiological safety exists because CCT calculations also include a weighting function covering the blue-light region; so if the proportion of blue light (and any associated risk) changes, so too does the CCT.