Wernicke's area


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Related to Wernicke's area: Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke's aphasia, Broca's area, Wernicke's syndrome

Wernicke's area

[′ver·ni·kēz ‚er·ē·ə]
(neuroscience)
An area located in the left temporal lobe just posterior to the primary auditory complex that is involved with speech comprehension, injury to this area results in fluent aphasia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Knowing that Wernicke's area is in the front of the auditory cortex could also provide clinical insights into patients suffering from brain damage, such as a stroke, or in disorders in speech comprehension.
The results pinpoint the location of Wernicke's area to be in the left temporal lobe, and specifically to be in the superior temporal gyrus, in front of the the primary auditory cortex.
It is caused by lesions in the arcuate fasciculus, the nerve fibers that connect Broca's area to Wernicke's area.
Finally, the prefrontal cortex (PF) may be responsible for modulation of processing in posterior regions such as Wernicke's area (Frith, Friston, Liddle, & Frackowiak, 1991; Raichle et al.
It was recorded that both groups, Broca's and Wernicke's areas were equally active.
Stories engage our entire brain: MRI research shows that when we process facts and figures we only engage small areas of our brain like Broca's and Wernicke's areas, where we process words and meanings.
The researchers did not find metaphor-specific differences in cortical regions well known to be involved in generating and processing language, such as Broca's or Wernicke's areas.
Aphasiasassociated with computed tomography scan lesions outside Broca's and Wernicke's areas.
So, in summary, when a person starts performing a language task, the brain responds by using up energy and producing chemical changes in the language centers of the brain (Broca's and Wernicke's areas, see Figure 3).
The researchers hypothesized that if the visual cortex was involved in language processing, those brain areas should show the same sensitivity to linguistic information as classic language areas such as Broca's and Wernicke's areas.