West

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west

1. one of the four cardinal points of the compass, 270° clockwise from north and 180° from east
2. the direction along a parallel towards the sunset, at 270° clockwise from north
3. the west any area lying in or towards the west
4. Cards the player or position at the table corresponding to west on the compass
5. (esp of the wind) from the west

West

1
1. Benjamin. 1738--1820, US painter, in England from 1763
2. Mae. 1892--1980, US film actress
3. Nathanael, real name Nathan Weinstein. 1903--40, US novelist: author of Miss Lonely-Hearts (1933) and The Day of the Locust (1939)
4. Dame Rebecca, real name Cicily Isabel Andrews (née Fairfield). 1892--1983, British journalist, novelist, and critic

West

2 the
1. the western part of the world contrasted historically and culturally with the East or Orient; the Occident
2. (formerly) the non-Communist countries of Europe and America contrasted with the Communist states of the East
3. (in the US)
a. that part of the US lying approximately to the west of the Mississippi
b. (during the Colonial period) the region outside the 13 colonies, lying mainly to the west of the Alleghenies
4. (in the ancient and medieval world) the Western Roman Empire and, later, the Holy Roman Empire

West

(1976 VI) A brilliant comet that passed within 30 million km of the Sun in Feb. 1976. The cometary nucleus broke into at least four fragments, accompanied by massive outbursts of gas and dust.

What does it mean when you dream about the West?

We associate the westerly direction with where the sun sets, so dreaming about the West could be alluding to the end of something (sunset) or to rest (after the sun goes down). In the United States, the west is traditionally associated with expansion and opportunity.

west

[west]
(geography)
The direction 90° to the left or 270° to the right of north.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the same year, working `with cooperation from the Forests Commission and water supply and shire engineers',(54) Weste isolated the fungus P.
The debate continued for several years,(62) Weste being one of the protagonists of the view that it was an invading organism.
Weste was one of those who maintained that the organism was in fact the primary cause of dieback disease in the forest and that therefore the dieback was not due just to man's interference and lack of proper management.
Weste studied the pathogen, its reproduction, infection processes and survival ability, and the changes it caused in native vegetation.
Weste was one of the first to recognise the gravity of the threat to Victoria's ecology and its economy.
Gretna Weste and her group have made considerable progress in studies of the destruction of native forests by the "dieback" disease, Phytophthora cinnamomi'.
Weste was attracted to the problem by the practical issues at stake.
Even in her retirement Weste continues to be consulted by government bodies such as the Land Conservation Council of Victoria.
Weste found that the pathogen has declined in population and distribution, and that species previously found susceptible are now reappearing.
But when opportunity came twenty years later, Weste seized it and proved that her early promise could still be fulfilled.
Once established, Weste found she was included in the informal networks of communication which operate among scientists, the importance of which is now well recognised.
Weste only admits to being personally discriminated against in her first position with the Forests Commission.

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