bran

(redirected from Wheat bran)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

bran,

outer coat of a cereal grain—e.g., wheat, rye, and corn—mechanically removed from commercial flour and meal by bolting or sifting. Wheat bran is extensively used as feed for farm animals. Bran is used as food for humans (in cereals or mixed with flour in bread) to add roughage (i.e., cellulose) to the diet. It is also used in dyeing and calico printing.

Bran

 

a miling by-product consisting of the seed coat of various grains and the remains of unsorted flour. There are wheat, rye, barley, rice, buckwheat, and other types of bran. Depending on the degree of pulverization, bran may be coarse or fine. Bran, primarily wheat and rye bran, is a valuable feed for all types of agricultural animals. The nutritional value of bran depends on the content of flour particles (the less flour and the more shell, the lower the nutritional value). The average composition of wheat bran is 14.8 percent water, 15.5 percent protein, 3.2 percent fat, 8.4 percent cellulose, 53.2 percent nitrogen-free extractive substances, and 4.9 percent ash. One hundred kg of bran contains 71–78 feed units and 12.5–13 kg of digestible protein. A high bran content in bread reduces digestibility, whereas a small amount of bran improves the taste of the bread and increases peristalsis. Flax bran is used for poultices, and mustard bran for mustard plasters. Almond bran is used as a softening agent for the face and hands.

Bran

god whose cauldron restored dead to life. [Welsh Myth.: Jobes, 241]
See: Death

Bran

god whose cauldron restored the dead to life. [Welsh Myth.: Jobes, 241]

bran

husks of cereal grain separated from the flour by sifting
References in periodicals archive ?
The AID and ATTD of DM, CP, EE, NDF, ADF, ash, OM, CHO, and DE content in wheat bran were calculated by the difference method (Fan and Sauer, 1995) using the equation below:
Freshwater shrimps (Caradina nilotica) available in Lake Victoria as a by-catch of the Silver cyprinid (Rastrineobola argentea) fishery, and rice and wheat brans, by-products of rice and wheat milling industries are in use in the Lake Victoria basin.
Crude wheat bran contains approximately 43 percent total dietary fiber, about 93 percent of which is insoluble.
This was in contrast to the pattern obtained with wheat bran where higher xylose concentration (2.
We believe that stabilized wheat bran, using our proprietary process, will offer flavor, shelf life and nutritional characteristics that will be functionally and economically attractive for blending with wheat flour.
In the Serdan area, Alltech uses wheat and wheat bran as raw material for its enzymes.
Several years ago, he patented a compressor that turns wheat bran into all manner of plates, bowls, cups and platters using no additives or preservatives.
Her text is not only informative, but also clever, as she tells how to banish beetles with wheat bran and eradicate weeds with sunflower seeds.
Sources of insoluble fiber: Wheat bran and wholegrain bread, crackers, and muffins; whole-wheat flour, brown rice, and kidney beans; skins of strawberries, pears, apples, and prunes; green beans, broccoli, spinach, and tomatoes; almonds and chunky peanut butter.
Guar gum and wheat bran were used to formulate two types of bread.
The authors note that other studies indicate that only wheat bran fiber reduces calcium absorption, although they were not able to determine so in this study.
These include lignans, found mainly in wheat bran and linseeds (flaxseed), isoflavones, found mainly in legumes and pulses, genistein, found in soya and many pulses, and biochanin and formononetin, which occur in good amounts of red clover, chickpeas, lentils and mung beans.