Wheeler-Feynman theory

Wheeler-Feynman theory

[′wēl·ər ′fīn·mən ‚thē·ə·rē]
(relativity)
A relativistic action-at-a-distance theory in which it is assumed that there are enough absorbers in the universe to serve as sinks for all actions that emanate from any charged particle; radiation damping is a consequence of the theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
A motivation for Wheeler-Feynman theory [1, 2] was Sommerfeld's quantization conditions of Hamiltonian mechanics [24, 25, 28].
Price, who does not endorse the Wheeler-Feynman theory, wants to use the mathematics of Wheeler and Feynman's discussion in [1945] to show that CRS = CAA, so that one and the same field can be seen, from different points of view, either as produced by the source and diverging outward from it, or as produced by the absorber, converging inward into it.
The original Wheeler-Feynman theory appears in their [1945].