white noise

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white noise

a. sound or electrical noise that has a relatively wide continuous range of frequencies of uniform intensity
b. noise containing all frequencies rising in level by six decibels every octave

white noise

See noise.

White Noise

 

a generalized stochastic process of the type

where ϕ(t) is a finite function and X(t) is a stochastic process with zero mathematical expectation and with the correlation function B(s, t) = δ(s – t). The generalized function δ is determined by the formula

for any finite functions ϕk(t), where k = 1,2. This process is a stationary stochastic process with a spectral density f(λ) = ½π, –∞ <λ < ∞, and with an absolutely continuous spectral measure

F(Δ) = ʃΔf(λ)dλ

White noise is used as a mathematical model in theoretical studies. Noise of any nature that has a uniform spectrum in a finite band of frequencies, such as the noise of electronic tubes, atmospheric noise, and oceanic noise, can be approximated quite well by the white-noise process.

REFERENCE

Prokhorov, Iu. V., and Iu. A. Rozanov. Teoriia veroiatnostei, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1973.

white noise

[′wīt ‚nȯiz]
(physics)
Random noise that has a constant energy per unit bandwidth at every frequency in the range of interest.

white noise

Noise having a flat spectrum over the frequency range of interest; the acoustic power per unit-frequency is substantially independent of frequency.

white noise

White, random or background noise caused, in aircraft propulsion, by the reaction of each blade to the flow of air over its surface. The noise is from the eddy shedding in the blade's wake, reacting back on the blade, and carrying random fluctuations over the blade surface. White noise may also be caused by turbulence in the airstream, and it can be found within electronic circuitry.

white noise

A random signal of every frequency in the audio spectrum, all of which have an average uniform power level. White noise is generated for a variety of purposes, including masking sounds in a room, testing loudspeakers for distortion and coloration and to provide input to a synthesizer, which uses filters to derive all of its sounds. Contrast with pink noise and Gaussian noise.