Whitsuntide


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Related to Whitsuntide: Whitsunday

Whitsuntide

the week that begins with Whit Sunday, esp the first three days
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, "Candlemas, Shrove Tuesday, Hocktide, May Day, Whitsuntide, Midsummer Eve, Harvest-home, Halloween, and the twelve days of the Christmas season ending with Twelfth Night," Barber, Shakespeare's festive comedy, 4.
Marlowe grew up in Canterbury, which was about twenty miles away from New Romney, where an extremely popular passion play was performed at Whitsuntide from the middle of the fifteenth century until 1568 (Gibson 1996, 137).
38) Todt's traffic surveyors had deliberately chosen Whitsuntide for counts, since these holidays were the prime time for excursion traffic.
The feast is also called Whitsun, Whitsunday, Whit Sunday, Whitsuntide.
48 Festival of Whitsuntide, seven weeks after Easter (9)
2) "Festive culture" is a term used to denote the social activities and artistic forms--including dances, ballads, processions, Maypole dances, and plays--enacted in festivals and other celebrations held during traditional agricultural and parish holidays, including Mayday, Whitsuntide, Christmas, and Easter.
On Good Thursday (March 23, 1570) Magnus reached Tartu, where he stayed for two months, until the Thursday following Whitsuntide (May 18).
Copious entries refer to Christmas and Easter plays in the fourteenth century, while in the fifteenth these were supplemented with Whitsuntide tournaments, Paternoster Plays, saint plays, Corpus Christi plays, and a major dramatic ceremony focusing on the Assumption and Coronation of the Virgin.
brought to each fair is considerable; but excepting in these, the Whitsuntide fair is one of little business.
At Whitsuntide 1918, Jane and Jbez were married, and at the wedding reception in the parlour of our farmhouse, Pen-y-Wern, the bridegroom responded to the toast by singing Quilter's setting of O Mistress Mine.
Why to the man of untutored ideality, who happens to be but loosely acquainted with the peculiar character of the day, does the bare mention of Whitsuntide marshal in the fancy such long, dreary, speechless processions of slow-pacing pilgrims, down-cast and hooded with new-fallen snow?
WE should abolish May Day Bank Holiday, and just have Easter, Whitsuntide, and August Bank Holiday - plus a bank holiday in October.