life cycle cost

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Also found in: Financial.

life cycle cost

The cost of a building or equipment (or the like) based not only on the initial expenditure, but also on its maintenance and operating costs over its entire lifetime.
References in periodicals archive ?
It will also reduce the environmental impact, improve the efficiency and reduce whole-life cost of new projects and buildings to help build the houses, schools, hospitals and transport projects we desperately need.
This report primarily compiles data to support whole-life cost estimates for a suite of small-scale distributed green infrastructure technologies with particular emphasis on maintenance costs.
Ofwat has followed other regulatory bodies by adopting a totex (total expenditure) approach which stimulates thought processes to drive the lowest whole-life cost of assets and projects within the water industry.
Whole-life cost analysis is an economic evaluation process solely for the purpose of assessing the true cost of constructing and running a building over a period of time, based on the functional requirements of the building.
To make fuel cells more cost-effective, we need to reduce their whole-life cost and maximise the value of the resources they contain, such as platinum, high-value polymers and carbon fibre.
The model, which made its world premiere at last month's Frankfurt Motor Show, promises major whole-life cost savings for fleet operators and significant financial benefits for company car drivers over rival models.
The model, promises major whole-life cost savings for fleet operators and financial benefits for company car drivers over rival models.
Our new centre will offer excellent standards at a low whole-life cost, and be a great place to come and work.
The benefit of using TCO is that a decision maker could be incentivised to go beyond the consideration of capital expenditure, and think of the potential whole-life cost arising through the use of their assets.
At the benchmark of 50 million [pounds sterling] per km of TGV-style railway, that's 28 billion [pounds sterling] in capital terms alone, even before the whole-life cost penalties of operating duplicated East Coast and West Coast train fleets are taken into account.
A 2002 government publication on the subject offered the following advice: "Take the long-term view--remember the whole-life cost of the project and specify the outcome you want to achieve.