whooping crane

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whooping crane:

see cranecrane,
large wading bird found in marshes in the Northern Hemisphere and in Africa. Although sometimes confused with herons, cranes are more closely related to rails and limpkins.
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whooping crane

[′hu̇p·iŋ ‚krān]
(vertebrate zoology)
Grus americana. A member of a rare North American migratory species of wading birds; the entire species forms a single population.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are six whooping cranes in this year's flock -- five females and one male.
Whooping cranes (Grus americana) are one of two extant crane species native to North America (Family Gruidae).
Unusual wintering distribution and migratory behavior of the Whooping Crane (Grus americana) in 2011-2012.
The annual Operation Migration winter whooping crane migration is approaching Alabama.
A preserve was established on Mormon Island in 1980 to help protect and maintain the physical, hydrological, and biological integrity of the region for migratory birds, especially Whooping Cranes and Sandhill Cranes.
Tourism figures show that a significant number of people visit the area to view rare or unique birds such as the whooping cranes and more than 630 other species of bird.
Through the extraordinary efforts of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership--a coalition of public and private organizations and individuals --a migrating population of whooping cranes now takes to the skies each year over the eastern United States, allowing people who may never have had the opportunity otherwise to glimpse this rare beauty.
Endangered whooping cranes flew 2,500 miles from Canada to Texas, where they usually spend the whole winter.
Operation Migration takes flight again after FAA exemption The Federal Aviation Administration will allow Operation Migration to continue paying light sport aircraft pilots to guide whooping cranes on a migration path.
A FLOCK of rare whooping cranes on its inaugural winter migration to Florida are grounded in Alabama while a US government agency decides whether a plane guiding them will be allowed to proceed.
His experience here blends with natural history and ecology to consider the sandhill and whooping cranes and their wetlands, blending in the latest details on migration patterns and population trends to explain its lifestyle and place in nature.
Operation Migration uses ultralight planes to guide whooping cranes from Florida to their summer grounds in Wisconsin