Widsith


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Widsith

(wĭd`sĭth), 7th-century Anglo-Saxon poem found in the Exeter BookExeter Book,
manuscript volume of Old English religious and secular poetry, of various dates of composition, compiled c.975 and given to Exeter Cathedral by Bishop Leofric (d. 1072). Bibliography

See edition by G. P. Krapp and E. V. K. Dobbie (1936).
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. It is an account of the wanderings of a Germanic minstrel and of the legends he relates. The poem gives an excellent description of minstrel life in the Germanic heroic age.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dos de esos poemas anglosajones son Deory Widsith, que analizaremos en este pequeno estudio.
The earliest accounts involving Wade are Widsith (11) (l.
To some extent, Robinsons claim also holds for Exeter Maxims which is "grouped with Widsith and The Fortunes of Men--two list-poems par excellence" (9) that appear to deal with Germanic antiquity and preconversion rituals and traditions.
The oldest English epic: Beowulf, Finnsburg, Waldere, Deor, Widsith, and the German Hildebrand.
And in the Old English poem Widsith, which hints at earlier Anglo-Saxon tales, "the noble Offa while still a boy won in battle the greatest of kingdoms.
In the "Creation" section, Michelet considers two Old English poems about beginnings, Caedmon's Hymn and also Widsith, in which language is viewed as shaping the material world, and she goes on to examine the creation topos in a range of other poems, notably Beowulf and Genesis, referring to different conceptions of creation evident in these texts--creation as transformation, creation as expansion, creation as building, and as enclosing.
Do you know the Anglo-Saxon scop Widsith the Wide-Traveled, author of the eponymous poem "Widsith"?
The first on art and history focuses on Deor and Widsith and in it Trilling advocates the application of Walter Benjamin's concept of 'the constellation' to Old English verse, an idea carried forward throughout the book.
We may also adduce the Anglo-Saxon legendary singer Widsith,
Poems such as Beowulf and The Battle of Maldon, Dream of the Rood and Widsith, along with prose texts and the texts of wills, charters, and laws come from what we might call an island in time, the cultures of which were themselves changing across time, yet, however changed from some earlier condition or mentality, still differ in significant ways from our own.
There are many surprises, for example, that Beowulf line 310a receda under roderum and lines 1505a and 1890a leodhosyrcan are unique; on the other hand, Hutcheson's lists confirm the well-known view that names and numbers lead to metrical rarities, and that some poems, Widsith and Genesis B prominent among them, have many rarities.
About half the book (Chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6) considers the mytho- and ethnopoetic dimensions of Beowulf, Widsith and The Battle of Maldon.